Isabella Watson

Wreck DiveWreck Dive | Boat access

Inside Port Phillip Open Water Rated Wreck Dive Site

Wooden Sailing Ship | Max Depth: 4 metres (13 feet)

Isabella Watson
Isabella Watson
© Unknown

The Isabella Watson, which lies on Nepean Reef, is historically significant as an example of an emigrant ship from the UK to Port Phillip. Its archaeological significance lies in the remainder of the ship's cargo that is associated with the wreck and has the potential to reveal information about mid C19th material culture. It is historically and socially significant for its association with the ongoing debate surrounding the Port Phillip Pilot Service, and for its association with 9 deaths.

See also, Australian National Shipwreck Database: Isabella Watson, and
Heritage Council Victoria: Isabella Watson.

Latitude: 38° 18.002′ S   (38.300033° S / 38° 18′ 0.12″ S)
Longitude: 144° 38.785′ E   (144.646417° E / 144° 38′ 47.1″ E)

Datum: WGS84 | Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2019-03-23 03:33:30 GMT
Source: Book - Shipwrecks Around Port Phillip Heads GPS (verified)
Nearest Neighbour: Time, 128 m, bearing 277°, W
Wooden ship, 514 ton.
Sunk: 21 September 1852.
Depth: 4 m.



DISCLAIMER: No claim is made by The Scuba Doctor as to the accuracy of the dive site coordinates listed here. Should anyone decide to use these GPS marks to locate and dive on a site, they do so entirely at their own risk. Always verify against other sources.

The marks come from numerous sources including commercial operators, independent dive clubs, reference works, and active divers. Some are known to be accurate, while others may not be. Some GPS marks may even have come from maps using the AGD66 datum, and thus may need be converted to the WGS84 datum. To distinguish between the possible accuracy of the dive site marks, we've tried to give each mark a source of GPS, Google Earth, or unknown.

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