Dive Shop Specials

IST Proline Duo-Chamber Split Fin Shaped Safety Whistle
IST Proline Duo-Chamber Split Fin Shaped Safety Whistle
$5.00 $4.00
Get $1.00 (20%) Off


Cressi Leonardo/Giotto Battery Kit
Cressi Leonardo/Giotto Battery Kit
$22.00 $20.00
Get $2.00 (9%) Off


Fourth Element Xerotherm 2001-2017 Drysuit Socks - Unisex
Fourth Element Xerotherm 2001-2017 Drysuit Socks - Unisex
$29.50 $28.00
Get $1.50 (5%) Off


OMS Single Tank Stabilising Adapter - Soft Low Profile
OMS Single Tank Stabilising Adapter - Soft Low Profile
$92.00 $82.00
Get $10.00 (11%) Off


Miflex Xtreme LP Regulator Hose 90 cm - 36" (Purple) - 3/8"
Miflex Xtreme LP Regulator Hose 90 cm - 36" (Purple) - 3/8"
$73.00 $63.00
Get $10.00 (14%) Off


Wilsons Promontory Dives

Wilsons Promontory Dives

Wilsons Promontory, Victoria is a peninsula that forms the southernmost part of the Australian mainland.

Wilsons Promontory National Park, also known locally as 'The Prom', contains the largest coastal wilderness area in Victoria. The only settlement within Wilsons Promontory is Tidal River which lies 30 km south of the park boundary and is the focus for tourism and recreation. This park is managed by Parks Victoria.

A scuba diving trip to Wilsons Promontory needs to be carefully planned. You need to bring plenty of extra cylinders, or a compressor, because the nearest air filling station is about 100 kilometres from Tidal River.

For snorkellers there are plenty of sites, however for many a very long walk or hike in is required. Scuba divers are unlikely to carry their heavy gear to those remote dive sites, so they only become accessible by boat for scuba diving.

Boats can be launched from the western end of Norman Bay beach at Tidal River. However, beach launching requires plenty of people to help, plus a lot of care and skill. The weather conditions need to be carefully considered, because while you may be able to launch okay, if the weather turns nasty and the surf gets up when the conditions change rapidly, retrieving the boat at Norman Beach can become impossible.

It's important to remember that when scuba diving, freediving, spearfishing or snorkelling at Wilsons Promontory, especially from a boat, that you are in an isolated area with areas of deep water and strong currents.

Bum Rock

Wall Dive Boat access
Advanced Open Water Rated Deep Rated Marine Park - No Fishing Wilsons Promontory

Bum Rock on the western side of Dannevig Island at Wilsons Promontory is hard to miss. The massive smooth granite boulder has a large crack in the centre, causing it to look just like its name.

The crack continues underwater and inwards about 10 metres down to the boulder covered bottom. The depth here is 30 plus metres, and the site can be subject to very strong surge, so be very careful.

Latitude: 39° 6.437′ S   (39.107289° S / 39° 6′ 26.24″ S)
Longitude: 146° 14.166′ E   (146.236105° E / 146° 14′ 9.98″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2019-03-13 01:16:33 GMT, Last updated: 2019-03-13 02:06:21 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Dannevig Island North East, 620 m, bearing 14°, NNE
Depth: 30+ m.
See the Bum Rock dive site page

Cambridge

Wreck Dive Boat access
Technical Rated Wreck Dive Site Wilsons Promontory
Cambridge
Cambridge
© Unknown

The wreck of the SS Cambridge is historically significant as the first Allied vessel to be lost in Australian waters in World War II. Along with the wrecks of the MS City of Rayville (1940), HMAS Goorangai (1940) and SS Iron Crown (1942) the Cambridge represents the arrival of World War II in Australian waters, the strategic importance of the Bass Strait shipping lane, and the extent of Axis activities in the Southern hemisphere.

While on a voyage from Cardiff (United Kingdom) to Brisbane via Sydney, the SS Cambridge struck a German mine and sunk in Bass Strait, 3.7 nm SE of Wilsons Promontory, on 7 November 1940.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: SS Cambridge, and
Australian National Shipwreck Database: S.S.Cambridge.

Latitude: 39° 9.810′ S   (39.1635° S / 39° 9′ 48.6″ S)
Longitude: 146° 29.780′ E   (146.496333° E / 146° 29′ 46.8″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2019-04-27 05:05:31 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Lady Mildred, 8,571 m, bearing 325°, NW
Steel hulled screw steamer.
Depth: 60 to 68 m.
Dive only on: SWF, SWE.
See the Cambridge dive site page

Cheviot

Wreck Dive Boat access
Marine Park - No Fishing Open Water Rated Wreck Dive Site Wilsons Promontory

Wooden Sailing Barque | Max Depth: 5 metres (16 feet)

The Cheviot foundered in Waterloo Bay anchorage at Wilsons Promontory on 24 March 1854. The Cheviot is archeologically significant for representing the remains of an early 19th century Atlantic, South Seas and colonial Australian whaling vessel.

Diving the Cheviot

The Cheviot shipwreck is lying on SW-NE axis with the bow facing SW and is 27.7 metres in length. It only rises 1.5 metres from the bottom but the number of fish congregating over the site gives it a good sonar return. The stern is identified by a dudgeon in situ on the sternpost. There was no sign of the rudder.

The wreck is heeled over on its port side. There were no anchors at the bow, suggesting it sank while anchored in a SW wind. Little remains of the stem and the outline of the bow area is indistinguishable or buried, a couple of very large copper alloy bolts about 1 metre in length as if from the deadwood are near the bow.

The cargo consists of bricks, lime and rounded riverine rock ballast. Also in evidence are iron hanging knees, numerous copper alloy bolts, an iron mast band, concretions, remains of an iron rigging chainplate on the starboard side, iron pipe, pulleys from the rigging and a large as yet unidentified concretion approx 2 metre square made up of indeterminate material, though possibly iron or lime. It may be a water tank, or remains of a lime cargo, or some other object.

There is evidence of extensive teredo worm activity on the exposed timbers, and the site appears to be subject to occasional burial and scouring. There is no wood left above the sheathing line and no sign of any heavy timber frames or knees. The keelson or sister keelson appears to have been eaten away leaving large protruding copper alloy bolts indicating the angle of heel. The timbers exposed were heavy planks in the midships area, and may be ceiling planking or outer planking. These also had evidence of teredo activity. Only one remnant of timber was observed, on the port side towards the bow. If the wreck is in fact buried to its sheathing line there would be substantial remains buried.

A concretion in the bow area may be a capstan.

Cheviot History

The Cheviot was built as an armed snow brig in 1827 and voyaged from Sunderland (UK). Lloyds Register indicates voyages to Quebec in 1830-31 and then the 'Southern Fisheries' in 1832-3, so it may have been whaling on the Atlantic coast of Canada as well.

Prior to the southern whaling voyage Cheviot was sold and appears to have had another deck added as the tonnage is also increased. It was whaling through to 1837 when it was re-registered in Hobart under the ownership of Capt. James Kelly. From that time the primary activity of the Cheviot was inter-colonial trade, while the whaling voyages became less frequent — probably as the catches diminished due to over fishing.

In 1842 the Cheviot was sold to Charles Seal and William John Mansfield of Hobart. After Seal's death Mansfield bought out his partner's share. Mansfield then lost his ownership of the vessel in 1853, though remained as master until the vessel was lost at Waterloo Bay, twelve months later.

See also Australian National Shipwreck Database: Cheviot, and
Heritage Council Victoria: Cheviot.

If you're looking for the Cheviot wreck at Cheviot Bay on the Back Beaches of Mornington Peninsula, please see SS Cheviot.

Latitude: 39° 4.800′ S   (39.08° S / 39° 4′ 48″ S)
Longitude: 146° 26.400′ E   (146.44° E / 146° 26′ 24″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2019-03-13 21:48:38 GMT, Last updated: 2019-03-23 04:06:04 GMT
Source: Australian National Shipwreck Database
Nearest Neighbour: Lady Mildred, 2,224 m, bearing 180°, S
Wooden Sailing Barque.
Built: 1827.
Sunk: 24 March 1854.
Depth: 5 m.
See the Cheviot dive site page

Dannevig Island North East

Wall Dive Boat access
Advanced Open Water Rated Marine Park - No Fishing Wilsons Promontory

The Dannevig Island North East dive site is at the North East tip of Dannevig Island in the Glennie Group of islands at Wilsons Promontory, Victoria, Australia. The dive site is between one rock that is exposed at low tide and another rock under about 5 metres of water just to the south of it.

The steep slope of the rocks goes down to about 15 metres. Then there are massive boulders going down to 25 to 30 metres deep. These form fantastic swin throughs.

But the highlight of this dive site is a large cave at about 25 metres down close to the northern tip of the island. There are a few entrances to the cave and its also great fun exploring the numerous swim throughs in the area.

This spectacular dive site is simply one of the best you can dive anywhere in the world.

Latitude: 39° 6.114′ S   (39.1019° S / 39° 6′ 6.84″ S)
Longitude: 146° 14.276′ E   (146.237933° E / 146° 14′ 16.56″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2019-03-13 01:46:31 GMT, Last updated: 2019-03-13 02:06:21 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Bum Rock, 620 m, bearing 194°, SSW
Depth: 10 to 30 m.
See the Dannevig Island North East dive site page

Elm Grove

Wreck Dive Boat access
Marine Park - No Fishing Wreck Dive Site Wilsons Promontory

Wooden Sailing Barque

There were only two survivors when on 9 September 1876 the wooden sailing barque Elm Grove was driven ashore on the Five Mile Beach at Wilsons Promontory. Seven seamen lost their lives.

Capt Leddra had previously been in command of the Vanquish, wrecked at Cape Jervis SA in 1864 and the A.H. Badger which sank after a collision with the SS Nevada in the Tasman Sea off NSW in October 1871 (Caldow).

See also, Australian National Shipwreck Database: Elm Grove, and
Heritage Council Victoria: Elm Grove.

Latitude: 38° 55.017′ S   (38.916944° S / 38° 55′ 1″ S)
Longitude: 146° 28.300′ E   (146.471667° E / 146° 28′ 18″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2019-03-12 00:29:33 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Miranda, 825 m, bearing 60°, ENE
Wooden barque.
Built: New Brunswick, Canada, 1863.
Sunk: 9 September 1876.
See the Elm Grove dive site page

Gulf of Carpentaria

Wreck Dive Boat access
Marine Park - No Fishing Technical Rated Wreck Dive Site Wilsons Promontory

On the 15th of September 1885, the Gulf of Carpentaria (aka SS Gulf of Carpentaria), bound for England, struck an uncharted rock off Wilson's Promontory, Victoria, Australia, and sank. Now, 130 years later, she lies mostly collapsed near the Anser Island Group. Nature is reclaiming her.


SS Gulf of Carpentaria shipwreck from Alan Beckhurst on Vimeo.

The Gulf of Carpentaria is historically significant as the wreck of an international cargo and passenger vessel, and for its role as a link between Britain and her colonies. It is archaeologically significant as it was wrecked without having been salvaged.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: SS Gulf of Carpentaria.

Latitude: 39° 8.775′ S   (39.14625° S / 39° 8′ 46.5″ S)
Longitude: 146° 17.645′ E   (146.294083° E / 146° 17′ 38.7″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2019-03-13 02:06:21 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Kanowna Island, 1,179 m, bearing 115°, ESE
Steamship, 2434/ 1569 ton.
Built: West Hartlepool, UK, 1881.
Sunk: 15 September 1885.
Depth: 48 to 50 m.
Dive only on: SWF, SWE.
See the Gulf of Carpentaria dive site page

Hannah Thompson

Wreck Dive Boat access
Marine Park - No Fishing Open Water Rated Wreck Dive Site Wilsons Promontory

Sailing Cutter | Max Depth: 8 metres (26 feet)

Level: Open Water and beyond.

Hannah Thompson
Hannah Thompson
© Unknown

The cutter Hannah Thompson had a varied career as a coastal trader, and was the first vessel to trade between Melbourne and Port Campbell. It was later used as a fishing vessel, and during this time it was blown ashore and wrecked in Oberon Bay on Wilsons Promontory.

The Hannah Thompson shipwreck lies in 5 to 8 metres of water 200 metres south of Oberon Point. The site is not suitable for diving when the wind blows from the northwest, west or southwest.

See also, Australian National Shipwreck Database: Hannah Thompson, and
Heritage Council Victoria: Hannah Thompson.

Latitude: 39° 3.900′ S   (39.065° S / 39° 3′ 54″ S)
Longitude: 146° 19.200′ E   (146.32° E / 146° 19′ 12″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2019-03-12 23:02:41 GMT, Last updated: 2019-03-23 03:55:53 GMT
Source: Australian National Shipwreck Database
Nearest Neighbour: Norman Point, South, 1,348 m, bearing 9°, N
Sailing Cutter.
Built: 1872.
Sunk: 27 July 1923.
Depth: 5 to 8 m.
See the Hannah Thompson dive site page

Kanowna Island

Reef Dive Boat access
Ideal For Snorkelling Marine Park - No Fishing Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site Wilsons Promontory

Seals!

Kanowna Island is part of the Anser Group of islands at Wilsons Promontory, Victoria, Australia. It is an active, protected Australian Fur Seal colony. There are so many playful, curious seals that diving with them becomes an exciting and thrilling experience as they speed past and play with you.

The rocks in the area form crevices and gullies which are interesting to explore if you can take you attention away from the seals. The rocks feature a very thick covering of kelps.

Maximum depth in the rocky area would be about 15 metres, but drops off to 100 metres quite close by. Surge can be an issue at this dive site.

Motorised and non-motorised vessels including sea kayaks are prohibited from within 200 metres of Kanowna Island from November to January (inclusive) and within 50 metres of the island at other times of the year.

Latitude: 39° 9.049′ S   (39.150817° S / 39° 9′ 2.94″ S)
Longitude: 146° 18.385′ E   (146.306417° E / 146° 18′ 23.1″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2019-03-13 01:58:56 GMT, Last updated: 2019-03-13 21:16:31 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Gulf of Carpentaria, 1,179 m, bearing 295°, WNW
Depth: 15 m.
See the Kanowna Island dive site page

Lady Mildred

Wreck Dive Boat access
Advanced Open Water Rated Marine Park - No Fishing Open Water Rated Wreck Dive Site Wilsons Promontory

Screw Steamer | Max Depth: 25 metres (82 feet)

Level: Open Water and beyond.

The steam collier Lady Mildred ran ashore in hazy weather on the eastern side of Wilsons Promontory. The vessel could not be salvaged and was abandoned. The master was found guilty of gross misconduct by a Court of Marine Inquiry.

The Lady Mildred shipwreck lies in 6 to 25 metres of water near a 10 metre rock face south of Waterloo Point. (The rock face has a cleft with red lichen staining the south rocks.) Most of the wreckage is in 10 to 15 metres of water and includes a 2 metre long anchor, lots of anchor chain, hawse pipe, bollards and part of the iron frames of the vessel lie in gullies and overhangs in the reef. Some areas of the ships hull retain structural integrity including a section of cabin reported by Carl Ebbels.

The site is best dived when the wind blows from the west or southwest.

See also, Australian National Shipwreck Database: Lady Mildred, and
Heritage Council Victoria: Lady Mildred.

Latitude: 39° 6.000′ S   (39.1° S / 39° 6′ S)
Longitude: 146° 26.400′ E   (146.44° E / 146° 26′ 24″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2019-03-12 22:43:41 GMT, Last updated: 2019-03-13 21:57:45 GMT
Source: Australian National Shipwreck Database
Nearest Neighbour: Cheviot, 2,224 m, bearing 0°, N
Screw Steamer.
Built: 1902.
Sunk: 15 February 1909.
Depth: 6 to 25 m.
See the Lady Mildred dive site page

Lune

Wreck Dive Boat access
Advanced Open Water Rated Wreck Dive Site Wilsons Promontory

The Swedish barque Lune was on a voyage from Newcastle to Batavia via Melbourne loaded with coal. In a thick fog it struck a reef on the eastern side of Cliffy Island, Wilsons Promontory. The crew reached safety, but the vessel soon broke up and sank in the heavy swell.

See also, Australian National Shipwreck Database: Lune, and
Heritage Council Victoria: Lune.

Latitude: 38° 57.000′ S   (38.95° S / 38° 57′ S)
Longitude: 146° 42.000′ E   (146.7° E / 146° 42′ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2019-03-12 02:38:05 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Rubicon, 13,014 m, bearing 321°, NW
Depth: 19 m.
See the Lune dive site page

Miranda

Wreck Dive Boat access
Marine Park - No Fishing Wreck Dive Site Wilsons Promontory

The wooden brigantine Miranda was a regular Bass Strait trader from Hobart and Launceston to Port Albert. It carried general cargo and building material to Port Albert and livestock to Tasmania. The vessel anchored in the shelter of Rabbit Island on a voyage from Hobart to Port Albert in August 1852. A strong south easterly caused the vessel to part from both anchors, and it went ashore in a cove on Wilson's Promontory that now bears its name. No lives were lost, but the vessel was subsequently condemned, and burnt on the beach where it lay.

The Miranda is significant as an example of an Australian built cargo ship working in the Bass Strait trade.

See also, Australian National Shipwreck Database: Miranda, and
Heritage Council Victoria: Miranda.

Latitude: 38° 54.800′ S   (38.913333° S / 38° 54′ 48″ S)
Longitude: 146° 28.800′ E   (146.48° E / 146° 28′ 48″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2019-03-12 01:53:36 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Elm Grove, 825 m, bearing 240°, WSW
Wooden Sailing Brig.
Built: 1846.
Sunk: 7 August 1852.
See the Miranda dive site page

Norman Bay, South

Reef Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Marine Park - No Fishing Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site Wilsons Promontory

Norman Bay, South is located near Tidal River in Norman Bay on the western side of Wilsons Promontory. This dive site is suitable for both snorkelling and scuba diving from the shore or boat. It has boulders sloping down to a sandy bottom at a depth of 18 metres.

From the southern end of Normanl Beach you head out into the water staying parallel to the rocks as you head towards Norman Point. Be aware that there can be strong surge and current at the tip of Norman Point.

See also, Parks Victoria: Norman Beach.

Latitude: 39° 2.788′ S   (39.046467° S / 39° 2′ 47.28″ S)
Longitude: 146° 19.251′ E   (146.320858° E / 146° 19′ 15.09″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2019-03-14 01:36:50 GMT, Last updated: 2019-03-14 06:48:00 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Norman Point, South, 744 m, bearing 168°, SSE
Depth: 18 m.
See the Norman Bay, South dive site page

Norman Point, South

Reef Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Marine Park - No Fishing Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site Wilsons Promontory

Norman Point, South is located in Little Oberon Bay on the western side of Wilsons Promontory. This dive site is suitable for both snorkelling and scuba diving from the shore or boat. It has small granite boulders gently sloping down to a sandy bottom at a depth of 15 metres.

For a shore entry you walk from Tidal River / Norman Bay to Little Oberon Bay and then along the rocks towards Norman Point until you find a suitable entry point. Underwater the rocks form many small caves and hollows. Be aware that there can be strong surge and current at the tip of Norman Point.

See also, Parks Victoria: Oberon Bay.

Latitude: 39° 3.182′ S   (39.053032° S / 39° 3′ 10.92″ S)
Longitude: 146° 19.351′ E   (146.322514° E / 146° 19′ 21.05″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2019-03-14 06:33:44 GMT, Last updated: 2019-03-14 06:48:00 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Norman Bay, South, 744 m, bearing 348°, NNW
Depth: 15 m.
See the Norman Point, South dive site page

Picnic Bay, South

Reef Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Marine Park - No Fishing Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site Wilsons Promontory

Picnic Bay, South on the western side of Wilsons Promontory is suitable for both snorkelling and scuba diving from the shore or boat. It has boulders sloping down to a sandy bottom at a depth of 6 metres about 150 metres out from the beach.

From the southern end of Picnic Bay beach you head around the rocks towards Leonard Point.

See also, Parks Victoria: Picnic Bay.

Latitude: 39° 1.138′ S   (39.018967° S / 39° 1′ 8.28″ S)
Longitude: 146° 17.337′ E   (146.28895° E / 146° 17′ 20.22″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2019-03-14 01:03:55 GMT, Last updated: 2019-03-14 01:38:38 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Pillar Point, South, 2,700 m, bearing 143°, SE
Depth: 6 m.
See the Picnic Bay, South dive site page

Pillar Point, South

Reef Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Marine Park - No Fishing Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site Wilsons Promontory

Pillar Point, South is located near Tidal River in Norman Bay on the western side of Wilsons Promontory. This dive site is suitable for both snorkelling and scuba diving from the shore or boat. It has boulders sloping down to a sandy bottom at a depth of 10 metres.

From the northern end of Normal Beach you head out into the water staying parallel to the rocks of Pillar Point. About 200 metres back from Pillar Point is a sheer rock face on shore and this marks the most interesting spot.

See also, Parks Victoria: Norman Beach.

Latitude: 39° 2.310′ S   (39.038493° S / 39° 2′ 18.57″ S)
Longitude: 146° 18.452′ E   (146.307528° E / 146° 18′ 27.1″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2019-03-14 01:26:11 GMT, Last updated: 2019-03-14 06:39:44 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Norman Bay, South, 1,453 m, bearing 127°, SE
Depth: 10 m.
See the Pillar Point, South dive site page

Queensland

Wreck Dive Boat access
Deep Rated Technical Rated Wreck Dive Site Wilsons Promontory

Three Masted, Single Screw Schooner | Max Depth: 65 metres (213 feet)

SS Queensland
Ship similar to the
SS Queensland
© Unknown

The shipwreck of the Queensland (aka SS Queensland) lies about 35 km due east of Wilsons Promontory, Victoria in about 65 metres of water. The SS Queensland was an Iron single screw passenger and cargo vessel owned by the Eastern and Australian Mail Steam Company. The ship sank off the coast of Wilson's Promontory on the 3rd August 1876 after a collision with the SS Barrabool.

Diving the SS Queensland

SS Queensland Seafloor Map
Seafloor Map of SS Queensland
© CSIRO

Located by G Hodge, M Ryan, M Whitmore, P Taylor and J Osmond of Souhern Ocean Exploration (SOE) on 25 June 2005, the SS Queensland lies at a depth of 65 metres (213 feet) on a sandy bottom. It is substanitally in tact with engines, boilers, winches, machinery, anchors, masts and chain on the site and it sits upright on the seabed.

SS Queensland History

The SS Queensland was an Iron, single screw, three masted, passenger and cargo schooner built in 1875 by Palmers Co Ltd of Jarrow, Newcastle, England, for Eastern and Australian Mail Steam Co Ltd. The ship was of 2,263 gross tons displacement, with a length of 325.3 feet (99 metres), a width of 36.7 feet (11 metres), and a depth of 25 feet (7.6 metres). She had a two cylinder inverted compounded steam engine of 309 hp. The hull was constructed with six watertight bulkheads and was rigged as a three masted topsail schooner.

Just prior to its wrecking in 1876, the passenger steamship Queensland was described by The Age as 'one of the finest steamers to visit Melbourne'.

SS Queensland Sinking

SS Queensland Collision
SS Queensland Collision
© Unknown

The large iron steamer Queensland, captained by the highly esteemed Robert Craig, sank off Wilsons Promontory after colliding with the steamer Barrabool in the early morning of 3 August 1876. The second mate of the Barrabool mistook the masthead light of the Queensland for the Wilsons Promontory lighthouse and made course for it.

The SS Barrabool was running full speed when it struck the Queensland's starboard side. The Queensland was badly damaged in the starboard side and sank in just 35 minutes. One crewman on the Queensland, second steward James Thomson, was reported missing and presumed drowned, while a number of others from both crews were injured.

Although the starboard bow of the SS Barrabool was badly damaged, it stayed afloat, and managed to keep from taking any water thanks to its sturdy bulkhead. The Barrabool was able to transport the survivors of the Queensland to safety under its own power.

The Queensland, which belonged to the Eastern and Australian Mail Company, was en route to Foo Chow Foo via Sydney, after offloading its cargo of Chinese tea at Melbourne's Sandridge Pier.

The second mate of the Barrabool, Ainsworth, had his certificate cancelled after his actions prior to the accident were found by the Steam Navigation Board to be reckless and the cause of the collision.

See also Heritage Council Victoria: SS Queensland,
Southern Ocean Exploration: SS Queensland, and
Australian National Shipwreck Database: SS Queensland.

Finding the SS Queensland

It's unlikely the GPS mark from the Australian National Shipwreck Database is accurate. If anyone has an accurate mark, please let us know.

Latitude: 39° 6.600′ S   (39.11° S / 39° 6′ 36″ S)
Longitude: 146° 43.800′ E   (146.73° E / 146° 43′ 48″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2019-05-07 13:00:57 GMT, Last updated: 2019-05-07 13:23:54 GMT
Source: Australian National Shipwreck Database
Nearest Neighbour: Lune, 17,979 m, bearing 351°, N
Three Masted, Single Screw Schooner.
Built: 1875 in Newcastle, England.
Sunk: 3 August 1876.
Depth: 65 m.
See the Queensland dive site page

Ramsbotham Rocks

Wall Dive Boat access
Advanced Open Water Rated Marine Park - No Fishing Wilsons Promontory

Ramsbotham Rocks is located on the north east tip of Great Glennie Island, which is the largest island in the Glennie Group at Wilsons Promontory, Victoria, Australia. It's a sheltered spot to dive, especially if there is a south easterly wind blowing. The dive site features interesting rock formations and large boulders with caves and swin throughs.

The rocks slope down to a sandy bottom at around 30 metres deep.

Latitude: 39° 4.279′ S   (39.071317° S / 39° 4′ 16.74″ S)
Longitude: 146° 13.526′ E   (146.225433° E / 146° 13′ 31.56″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2019-03-13 01:34:36 GMT, Last updated: 2019-03-13 02:06:22 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Dannevig Island North East, 3,568 m, bearing 162°, SSE
Depth: 20 to 30 m.
See the Ramsbotham Rocks dive site page

Refuge Cove, North Wall

Reef Dive Boat access
Ideal For Snorkelling Marine Park - No Fishing Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site Wilsons Promontory

Refuge Cove, North Wall on the eastern side of Wilsons Promontory is suitable for both snorkelling and scuba diving. It has boulders sloping down to a sandy bottom at a depth of 14 metres. There are groups of boulders forming, swim throughs, caves, and overhangs.

The site is sheltered from most wind conditions even when easterlies prevent diving elsewhere.

Information for boat users

  • Boat users only require a permit if camping on land overnight. A ranger may be present at Refuge Cove and Sealers Cove.
  • Overnight camping for boat visitors is permitted for two nights in designated areas.
  • Generators are not permitted on shore. Use of compressors to fill scuba cylinders is only permitted on North Refuge Beach.
  • To prevent the spread of the Northern Pacific Seastar, please ensure that all watercraft and equipment are clean and dry before and after entering watercourses.
  • Tying stern lines to vegetation is prohibited.
  • Fishing is not permitted in Marine National Parks. Fishing is permitted in Marine Parks.

See also, Parks Victoria: Refuge Cove.

Latitude: 39° 2.195′ S   (39.03658° S / 39° 2′ 11.69″ S)
Longitude: 146° 28.165′ E   (146.469422° E / 146° 28′ 9.92″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2019-03-13 20:34:13 GMT, Last updated: 2019-03-13 21:03:29 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Refuge Cove, South, 673 m, bearing 229°, SW
Depth: 14 m.
See the Refuge Cove, North Wall dive site page

Refuge Cove, South

Reef Dive Boat access
Ideal For Snorkelling Marine Park - No Fishing Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site Wilsons Promontory

Refuge Cove, South on the eastern side of Wilsons Promontory is suitable for both snorkelling and scuba diving. It has boulders sloping down to a sandy bottom at a depth of 9 metres.

The site is sheltered from most wind conditions even when easterlies prevent diving elsewhere. This is a good spot for a night dive if you're camping at Refuge Cove.

Information for boat users

  • Boat users only require a permit if camping on land overnight. A ranger may be present at Refuge Cove and Sealers Cove.
  • Overnight camping for boat visitors is permitted for two nights in designated areas.
  • Generators are not permitted on shore. Use of compressors to fill scuba cylinders is only permitted on North Refuge Beach.
  • To prevent the spread of the Northern Pacific Seastar, please ensure that all watercraft and equipment are clean and dry before and after entering watercourses.
  • Tying stern lines to vegetation is prohibited.
  • Fishing is not permitted in Marine National Parks. Fishing is permitted in Marine Parks.

See also, Parks Victoria: Refuge Cove.

Latitude: 39° 2.430′ S   (39.040508° S / 39° 2′ 25.83″ S)
Longitude: 146° 27.810′ E   (146.4635° E / 146° 27′ 48.6″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2019-03-13 20:53:00 GMT, Last updated: 2019-03-13 21:03:29 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Refuge Cove, North Wall, 673 m, bearing 49°, NE
Depth: 9 m.
See the Refuge Cove, South dive site page

Sealers Cove

Reef Dive Boat access
Ideal For Snorkelling Marine Park - No Fishing Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site Wilsons Promontory

Sealers Cove at Wilsons Promontory is a safe site suitable for scuba diving from a boat and snorkelling from the shore. It features small boulders gently sloping down to a sandy bottom at a depth of 15 metres.

See also, Sealers Cove: A walker's paradise, and
Parks Victoria: Sealers Cove.

Latitude: 39° 1.049′ S   (39.017475° S / 39° 1′ 2.91″ S)
Longitude: 146° 26.714′ E   (146.445237° E / 146° 26′ 42.85″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2019-03-13 20:17:21 GMT, Last updated: 2019-03-13 21:03:29 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Refuge Cove, North Wall, 2,980 m, bearing 135°, SE
Depth: 15 m.
See the Sealers Cove dive site page

Skull Rock

Wall Dive Boat access
Advanced Open Water Rated Deep Rated Marine Park - No Fishing Slack Water Wilsons Promontory
Scull Rock
Scull Rock
© Unknown

Skull Rock (or Cleft Island) forms part of the Anser Group of islands southwest of Wilsons Promontory. The sheer granite rock formation and caves that rise some 113 metres above sea level look skull like from a distance.

The rock formation continues 40 plus metres underwater and makes for awesome diving. There are underwater caves and playful Australian Fur Seals often come to see divers here.

Because of the depths that can be reached here, plus the sometimes strong currents, Skull Rock is best dived at slack water.

Latitude: 39° 9.433′ S   (39.15722° S / 39° 9′ 25.99″ S)
Longitude: 146° 17.602′ E   (146.293363° E / 146° 17′ 36.11″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2019-03-13 00:48:32 GMT, Last updated: 2019-03-20 07:38:57 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Gulf of Carpentaria, 1,221 m, bearing 2°, N
Depth: 40+ m.
See the Skull Rock dive site page

Tin Mine Cove

Reef Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Marine Park - No Fishing Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site Slack Water Wilsons Promontory

Tin Mine Cove at Wilsons Promontory is suitable for both snorkelling and scuba diving. If snorkelling, walk to the point from the beach. If scuba diving from a boat, anchor next to the big boulder at the north end of Tin Mine Cove beach.

The site slopes off gently from the beach to a depth of 15 metres about 50 metres offshore. Best not to go much further out as there is a deep channel which is subject to strong tidal currents. Best dived at slack water.

See also, Parks Victoria: Tin Mine Cove.

Latitude: 38° 48.235′ S   (38.803917° S / 38° 48′ 14.1″ S)
Longitude: 146° 25.215′ E   (146.42025° E / 146° 25′ 12.9″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2019-03-13 07:50:21 GMT, Last updated: 2019-03-13 20:59:11 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Tomatin, 6,060 m, bearing 85°, E
Depth: 15 m.
See the Tin Mine Cove dive site page

Total of 22 dive sites.

Other Resources

The best reference book for diving at Wilsons Promontory is:

Down Under at the Prom

Down Under at the Prom
Down Under at the Prom

"Down Under at the Prom
A guide to marine life and dive sites at Wilsons Promontory"
Authors: Marg O'Toole and Malcolm Turner
Format: Paperback, 111 pages
Publication Date: 31 Dec 1990
Publisher: Field Naturalists Club of Victoria
ISBN10: 0730620565
ISBN13: 9780730620563
Status: Out of print

A very well presented book covering sites as well as marine animals off Wilsons Promontory. Commences with a description of the unique features of 'The Prom', the diving opportunities, and use of underwater photography. This is followed by an extensive section on the marine life — why the Prom is so interesting: its seaweeds and grasses, the sponges, cnidarians, worms, mosses, crustacea, sea-spiders, echinoderms, molluscs, sea-squirts, fish, mammals and seabirds. A thirty page section covers the better dive sites in some detail. Definitely recommended reading. Covers the major locations, and strong on marine life to be expected.

The Scuba Doctor Service and Repairs

The closer I get to the bottom, the further I am from idiots.
— Old diver's proverb