Melbourne Shore Dives


"Who would believe.. this is Melbourne!" by David Bryant, SeaPics

With two large bays and an ocean coastline nearby, Melbourne always has plenty of magnificent shore diving and snorkelling locations on offer regardless of the weather conditions and season.

It all starts on the Bellarine Peninsula and Corio Bay, south of Melbourne on the Western side of Port Phillip Bay. Cottage By The Sea Reef, in Lonsdale Bay, is a great shore dive.

Melbourne's popular beaches and marine protected areas along the shores and 260 kilometres (162 miles) coastline of Port Phillip Bay have many great wonders to be found by intrepid snorkellers and scuba divers. The natural beauty and local marine life to be found is simply amazing.

South of Melbourne on the Mornington Peninsula, more than 100 different species of nudibranchs have been sighted under Blairgowrie Pier. You'll more than likely come across seahorses at Rye Pier and weedy sea dragons at Portsea Pier.

Experienced and adventurous divers can also check out the rugged shores of Melbourne's Back Beaches on the Nepean Peninsula, where the land meets the often wild seas of Bass Strait. Diamond Bay and others are probably the best shore diving sites in the whole of Victoria, but can only be accessed when conditions are just right. See also, Diving the Back Beaches.

Finally, there are some unique dive sites in Westernport Bay. Flinders Pier is a popular choice, especially when you want to take a look at weedy sea dragons. See also, Weedy Seadragons Melbourne.

Such a wide variety of dive locations and so many choices. And it's all cheaply accessible by scuba diving or snorkelling at these great shore dive sites close to Melbourne.

Contact us on 03 5985 1700 for further information including recommendations for appropriate dive sites according to weather conditions.

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The shore dives on this page are divided up into sections, the same way as in the reference book 'Shore Dives of Victoria'.


 

Bellarine Peninsula and Corio Bay
— Point Lonsdale to Geelong

Buckleys Cave

Shore Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Marine Park - No Fishing Open Water Rated Outside Port Phillip Bay Reef Dive Site

Depth: 2 to 10 metres

Level: Advanced Open Water and beyond.

Buckley's Cave at the foot of Point Lonsdale lighthouse is named after William Buckley, an escapee from Sorrento who was reputed to have lived in the cave from 1803 until his return to white civilisation in 1835.

This is the starting point for some very interesting shore dives. Access is not difficult, especially at low water. Access is via the path from the lighthouse, past Buckley's Cave, straight into the water, or out onto the platform.

From here you can explore Mushroom Rock, and the shark gutter. The area is part of the Harold Holt Marine Reserve.

The highlight of these shore dives are the many wrecks that have been hammered onto these reefs from the seaward side. The wrecks of the Glaneuse, George Roper, Black Boy, Holyhead and Gange all lie here abouts.

These shore dives are for experienced divers only. Skill is required to pick the conditions and times the site can be dived. Best to dive at slack water.

This site lies in the Port Phillip Heads Marine National Park. The park is made up of six separate marine areas around the southern end of Port Phillip: Swan Bay, Mud Islands, Point Lonsdale, Point Nepean, Popes Eye, and Portsea Hole.

See also, Parks Victoria: Port Phillip Heads Marine National Park, and Port Phillip Heads Marine National Park - Map (PDF 1.4 MB).

Latitude: 38° 17.562′ S   (38.292699° S / 38° 17′ 33.72″ S)
Longitude: 144° 36.844′ E   (144.614067° E / 144° 36′ 50.64″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-27 21:35:18 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Glaneuse, 146 m, bearing 249°, WSW
Depth: 2 to 10 m.

Point Lonsdale Kelp Forest

Reef Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Marine Park - No Fishing Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site

The Point Lonsdale Kelp Forest grows along the edge of Shark Gutter and extends around towards the Lonsdale Jetty. You need calm conditions, and even then you need to be looking out for currents that can eddy through and around the area at peak tide flows.

This site lies in the Port Phillip Heads Marine National Park. The park is made up of six separate marine areas around the southern end of Port Phillip: Swan Bay, Mud Islands, Point Lonsdale, Point Nepean, Popes Eye, and Portsea Hole.

See also, Parks Victoria: Port Phillip Heads Marine National Park, and Port Phillip Heads Marine National Park - Map (PDF 1.4 MB).

Latitude: 38° 17.578′ S   (38.292968° S / 38° 17′ 34.68″ S)
Longitude: 144° 36.973′ E   (144.616213° E / 144° 36′ 58.37″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-27 21:26:00 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Point Lonsdale Jetty, 148 m, bearing 358°, N
Depth: 3 to 5 m.

Point Lonsdale Jetty

Pier Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Marine Park - No Fishing Night Dive Site Open Water Rated

Depth: 3 to 5 metres

Point Lonsdale Jetty makes for an interesting dive even though the water is shallow. This is ocean territory with a rocky bottom supporting plenty of marine life.

During slack water you can head North and East to patches of reef. But if you get it wrong you could be easily swept away. So short dives only.

Another option her is to head South from the jetty to the Point Lonsdale Kelp Beds.

This site lies in the Port Phillip Heads Marine National Park. The park is made up of six separate marine areas around the southern end of Port Phillip: Swan Bay, Mud Islands, Point Lonsdale, Point Nepean, Popes Eye, and Portsea Hole.

See also, Parks Victoria: Port Phillip Heads Marine National Park, and Port Phillip Heads Marine National Park - Map (PDF 1.4 MB).

Latitude: 38° 17.498′ S   (38.291637° S / 38° 17′ 29.89″ S)
Longitude: 144° 36.970′ E   (144.616169° E / 144° 36′ 58.21″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-27 21:25:31 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Point Lonsdale Kelp Forest, 148 m, bearing 178°, S
Depth: 3 to 5 m.

The Springs, Lonsdale Bay

Shore Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site

Depth: 0 to 5 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

Offshore from here is an expanse of shallow reef with good fish life.

As the site is sheltered and has only mild currents, it's often used as a training dive site.

Latitude: 38° 16.450′ S   (38.274171° S / 38° 16′ 27.02″ S)
Longitude: 144° 37.568′ E   (144.626126° E / 144° 37′ 34.05″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-16 09:18:45 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Victory Cray Reef, 1,237 m, bearing 138°, SE
Depth: 0 to 5 m.

Cottage By The Sea Reef

Shore Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site

Depth: 0 to 10 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

Ideal Conditions:
Best dived on the ebb flow when it is low tide at The Heads. Conditions are usually best with no wind or after a few days of Northerlies as surface conditions remain calm.

What To Expect:
One of Melbourne's most well known and best shore dive location on this side of Port Phillip Bay. This site is in the bite between point Lonsdale and Shortland's Bluff or Queenscliff. Named after a historic building on the foreshore the diving here although shallow is beautiful with a series of small reefs running parallel to the shore. Lots of fish and the odd old bottle may be seen here. This is a great site for the last dive of the day or as a training dive.

Abundance of fish life including cuttlefish, crays, sea dragons, etc. The dive site opens up towards the main heads of Port Phillip Bay and is often exposed to ocean swell. On a good day it is an awesome dive with significant cliff faces, bommies and rock formations down to a depth of about 9 metres. It can get a little busy during summer.

Rock wall of 2-4 metres is about a 50 metre swim from shore and is a few hundred metres long. You will need to swim at a bearing of 190 degrees over sand to get to the reef. Most of the dive is at around 6 to 8 metres. The rock wall has swimthroughs and ledges you can poke your head under. Can be current and swell prone so weather is important to take note of.

The critters here include stingrays, damselfish, morwong, wrasse, blue devils, old wives, leatherjackets, weedy sea dragons and cuttlefish. Lots of pretty starfish as well.

Location: Queenscliff
MELWAY Ref: Page 499 C12

Weather Required: N to W winds. Needs to be low tide at the heads and dived in slack water to ebb tide as the current can be quite strong.

Access: Shore entry, head down the stairs and straight out to the sea, not a long walk.

Facilities: Small free carpark. No lighting.

Latitude: 38° 16.341′ S   (38.272352° S / 38° 16′ 20.47″ S)
Longitude: 144° 38.990′ E   (144.649837° E / 144° 38′ 59.41″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-04-17 00:05:40 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Shortland Bluff, 831 m, bearing 103°, ESE
Depth: 0 to 10 m.

Shortland Bluff

Shore Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site Slack Water

Depth: 3 to 15 metres

Level: Advanced Open Water and beyond.

Provided you are experienced in currents, diving off the platform around Shortland Bluff beacon while challenging is well worth the effort.

Shortland Bluff is best dived on a slack water flood.

Latitude: 38° 16.447′ S   (38.274112° S / 38° 16′ 26.8″ S)
Longitude: 144° 39.545′ E   (144.659085° E / 144° 39′ 32.71″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-26 07:25:25 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Torpedo Reef, 564 m, bearing 126°, SE
Depth: 3 to 15 m.

Queenscliff Pier

Pier Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated

Depth: 2 to 8 metres

Queenscliff Pier is a popular diver training spot.

Latitude: 38° 16.029′ S   (38.26715° S / 38° 16′ 1.74″ S)
Longitude: 144° 40.021′ E   (144.667014° E / 144° 40′ 1.25″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-16 06:03:36 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Sponge Garden Drift, 878 m, bearing 184°, S
Depth: 2 to 8 m.

St Leonards Pier

Pier Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated Wreck Dive Site

Depth: 4 to 6 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

St Leonard's Pier and Wreck is rated as the best pier dive in the area. This dive site is well worth a visit day or night.


St Leonard's Locals from Alan Beckhurst on Vimeo.

There is an unidentified shipwreck at this dive site that is worth having a look at. See "Site Survey: Unidentified Wreck at St Leonards Pier, St Leonards, Victoria" for more details.

See also St Leonards Surf Cam.

Latitude: 38° 10.213′ S   (38.170223° S / 38° 10′ 12.8″ S)
Longitude: 144° 43.246′ E   (144.720771° E / 144° 43′ 14.78″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-25 18:42:49 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: The Pipelines, Indented Head, 2,350 m, bearing 352°, N
Depth: 4 to 6 m.

The Pipelines, Indented Head

Shore Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site

Depth: 1 to 4 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

The Pipelines at Indented Head are the water intake for the Great Southern Water onshore abalone farm. They run out about 500 metres towards Governor Reef. The end of the pipelines is marked with a yellow buoy.

Be careful of boats in this area and take a dive flag buoy.

Latitude: 38° 8.956′ S   (38.14926° S / 38° 8′ 57.34″ S)
Longitude: 144° 43.040′ E   (144.717334° E / 144° 43′ 2.4″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-25 18:41:04 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Ozone, 1,173 m, bearing 343°, NNW
Depth: 1 to 4 m.

Dominion

Wreck Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Open Water Rated Wreck Dive Site

Depth: 2 to 4 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

The wooden barque Dominion was towed into Melbourne from Fremantle in 1902. Licence to operate as a coal/wool lighter issued by Melbourne Harbor Trust to owners, Howard Smith & Co. Ltd. Renewed 1 June 1916. New owner Australian Steamships Ltd 25 January 1917 - licence renewed 12 February 1918. Captain Forbes purchased the hulk in 1925, together with paddle steamer Ozone, to act as breakwater for small craft. The scheme failed when vandals set fire to Dominion, and Ozone did not settle in correct position. Register closed November 1921. Originally a wool ship, then Newcastle coal hulk.

From the beach at Indented Head, make your way out over the shallow sandy bottom to the Ozone and explore the remains. The remains of the Dominion are about 20 metres north of the Ozone.

The area is popular for dive training and it allows divers to have an interesting wreck dive at the same time.

See also, Australian National Shipwreck Database: Dominion, and Heritage Council Victoria: Dominion.

Latitude: 38° 8.342′ S   (38.139037° S / 38° 8′ 20.53″ S)
Longitude: 144° 42.810′ E   (144.713507° E / 144° 42′ 48.63″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-27 08:54:43 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Ozone, 13 m, bearing 142°, SE
Wooden barque/lighter.
Built: Quebec, Canada.
Sunk: 1925.
Depth: 2 m.

Ozone

Wreck Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Open Water Rated Wreck Dive Site
Ozone
Ozone
© Unknown

Depth: 2 to 4 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

The Ozone was a bay paddle steamer and it was sunk in October 1925, together with the Dominon, to form a breakwater for the bay near Indented Head.

Head out over the shallow sandy bottom to the Ozone and explore the remains. The remains of the Dominion shipwreck are about 20 metres north of the Ozone.

The area is popular for dive training and it allows divers to have an interesting wreck dive at the same time.

The Ozone is socially significant as one of the well known 'Bay Steamers' that used to ply Port Phillip and Corio Bay with passengers on short trips and excursions. The Bay Steamer 'wings' on Station Pier and jetties such as at Clifton Springs, Queenscliff and Portsea are other reminders of this era. The Ozone is also recreationally significant as an easily accessible shipwreck site that can be snorkelled and dived, with boilers, steering quadrant, paddlewheels and bow section providing interest and a home for marine life.

See also, Wikipedia: Ozone (paddle steamer), MAAV: Ozone 1886-1925, Australian National Shipwreck Database: Ozone, and Heritage Council Victoria: Ozone.

Latitude: 38° 8.348′ S   (38.13913° S / 38° 8′ 20.87″ S)
Longitude: 144° 42.816′ E   (144.713598° E / 144° 42′ 48.95″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-27 08:53:15 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Dominion, 13 m, bearing 322°, NW
Bay steamer.
Built: Glasgow, 1886.
Sunk: 1925.
Depth: 2 to 4 m.

Steeles Rocks, Portarlington

Shore Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site

Depth: 1 to 5 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

There's a small car park and boat ramp, so you can usually park very close to the water. About 50 metres offshore there are rocks sticking out of the water which are surrounded by drop offs and boulders.

Latitude: 38° 6.727′ S   (38.112111° S / 38° 6′ 43.6″ S)
Longitude: 144° 39.915′ E   (144.665242° E / 144° 39′ 54.87″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-16 06:10:27 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Portarlington Pier, 1,175 m, bearing 267°, W
Depth: 1 to 5 m.

Portarlington Pier

Pier Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated
Artificial reef at Portarlington Pier
Portarlington Pier

Depth: 2 to 5 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

Best done at high tide for extra depth under the pier. The sheltered, sandy site makes a nice night dive. You'll probably spend most of your time exploring the outer wall, but beware of fishing lines and take a good dive knife.

Don't forget to check out the artificial reef 40 to 70 metres seaward of Portarlington Pier's rock wall section.

Latitude: 38° 6.752′ S   (38.112541° S / 38° 6′ 45.15″ S)
Longitude: 144° 39.109′ E   (144.651819° E / 144° 39′ 6.55″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-16 03:10:25 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Steeles Rocks, Portarlington, 1,175 m, bearing 87°, E
Depth: 2 to 5 m.

Clifton Springs Piers

Pier Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated

Depth: 2 to 5 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

There are three pier ruins in this area. To the west is Drysdale Jetty. In the middle are the ruins of a pier with old swimming baths at the end. To the east are the ruins of the very long Old Clifton Springs Jetty.

Bottle hunting here is popular but requires skill not to stir up the sand and sediment. Seahorses, nudibranchs, stingrays and pipefish can be found at these piers.


Clifton Springs Night Dive from Alan Beckhurst on Vimeo.

Latitude: 38° 9.164′ S   (38.152728° S / 38° 9′ 9.82″ S)
Longitude: 144° 33.760′ E   (144.562667° E / 144° 33′ 45.6″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-15 17:49:00 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Portarlington Pier, 8,987 m, bearing 60°, ENE
Depth: 2 to 5 m.

Geelong Baths

Shore Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated

Depth: 2 to 5 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

Ideal Conditions:
High tide gives extra depth under the walkway.

What To Expect:
Flathead, old wives, moonlighters etc. can be seen on the silty bottom.

The Geelong Sea Baths site is quite crap and the vis is often going to be atrocious. Lots of rubbish in the sea baths and it's quite icky. If you swim along the inside of the baths, the bars will bang against each other which is kind of freaky.

Not much sealife but that could be because of the bad viz. There are some sponge growths on the seabath walls. Lots of relics to find that people have dropped in amongst the rubbish.

Location: Geelong
MELWAY Ref: Page 452 E3

Weather Required: Protected from all winds other than NE winds, however visibility will be ruined by any wind around Corio Bay as it is stirred up easily.

Access: Short walk from carpark. Fee for carpark, but not sure how much.

Facilities: Toilets, cafe near by.

Latitude: 38° 8.797′ S   (38.146614° S / 38° 8′ 47.81″ S)
Longitude: 144° 22.392′ E   (144.373192° E / 144° 22′ 23.49″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-17 23:32:12 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Lightning, 843 m, bearing 302°, WNW
Depth: 2 to 5 m.

Lightning

Wreck Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Open Water Rated Wreck Dive Site
Lightning
Lightning
© Unknown

The Lightning is historically significant for being one of the fastest wooden ships ever built, the first clipper built in the USA for British owners and being the worst shipping disaster in Geelong's history. It spent its whole career carrying cargo and immigrants from England to Australia.

See also, Australian National Shipwreck Database: Lightning, and Heritage Council Victoria: Lightning.

Latitude: 38° 8.550′ S   (38.1425° S / 38° 8′ 33″ S)
Longitude: 144° 21.906′ E   (144.3651° E / 144° 21′ 54.36″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-27 08:59:19 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Cunningham Pier, Geelong, 266 m, bearing 276°, W
Sailing vessel.
Built: 1854.
Lost: 31/10/1869.
Depth: 2 to 5 m.

Cunningham Pier, Geelong

Pier Dive Shore access
Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated

Depth: 3 to 10 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

In the central harbour area of Geelong there is Cunningham Pier, the remains of Steampacket Wharf, the remains of Yarra Pier, and the wreck of the sailing clipper ship Lightning.

Latitude: 38° 8.534′ S   (38.142239° S / 38° 8′ 32.06″ S)
Longitude: 144° 21.725′ E   (144.362077° E / 144° 21′ 43.48″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-17 23:32:40 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Lightning, 266 m, bearing 96°, E
Depth: 3 to 10 m.

Rippleside Pier, Geelong

Pier Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated

Depth: 1 to 5 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

There is no public access to Rippleside Pier, so you need to make your entry and exit from the northern end of Rippleside Beach. Go directly to and from the pier, and stay under the pier during your dive.

Latitude: 38° 7.598′ S   (38.126633° S / 38° 7′ 35.88″ S)
Longitude: 144° 21.482′ E   (144.358035° E / 144° 21′ 28.93″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-17 23:32:54 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Cunningham Pier, Geelong, 1,771 m, bearing 168°, SSE
Depth: 1 to 5 m.

 

Port Phillip Bay
— Point Cooke to Point Nepean

Point Cooke Beach

Shore Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Marine Park - No Fishing Night Dive Site Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site

Depth: 2 to 5 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

Situated on the sheltered rocky shores of north-western Port Phillip Bay, Point Cooke Beach is located within the Point Cooke Marine Sanctuary. A narrow sandy beach separates the land from the sea.

Beneath the water prickly sea urchins are abundant near crevices, while the more exposed sections of the rock support a range of life that includes masses of tubeworms, carpets of anemones and turfs of tufting coralline and filamentous algae. In darker corners, sponges grow plentifully while the Southern Blennies hide in the crevices. Small sharks and skates patrol the surrounding eelgrass beds and muddy seafloor.

Diving and snorkelling sites at Point Cooke include two heritage listed shipwrecks - Henrietta and Diana. Many small fish and invertebrates can be seen on the rocky reef.

See also Parks Victoria: Point Cooke Marine Sanctuary, and Point Cooke Marine Sanctuary Park Notes.

Latitude: 37° 55.781′ S   (37.929684° S / 37° 55′ 46.86″ S)
Longitude: 144° 46.367′ E   (144.772791° E / 144° 46′ 22.05″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-26 18:44:45 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Diana - Point Cooke, 1,510 m, bearing 91°, E
Depth: 2 to 5 m.

Altona Pier

Pier Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated
Artificial reef at Altona Pier
Altona Pier

Depth: 1 to 5 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

Location: Altona
MELWAY Ref: Page 54 H11

Altona Pier, in Hobson's Bay, runs out over shallow water almost to the end where the sandy bottom finally deepens to 5 metres or so. Good for both day and night diving with lots of sand dwellers and small fish.

The pylons are covered in muscles and at the end of the pier there lies a supermarket trolly. An excellent training ground for new divers close to the city of Mebourne.

Fairly boring site with not much to see. Entry is best done with a back roll off the lower landing as it is very shallow.

The pier is very sandy and has a black muck towards the end. Marine life, what little of it is there, is very skittish. Puffers and fish like that around the pier. The most interesting sea creatures are found as statues at the start of the pier.

Probably better as a snorkelling site.

Don't forget to check out the artificial reef 40 to 65 metres seaward of Altona Pier.

Weather Required: N, NE, NW and W winds should be ok, or light S, SW and E winds. Not sure if it is affected by rain.

Access: Short walk from carpark near beach. Carpark is busy in summer.

Facilities: Free parking, toilets, lots of shops, park with benches to eat.

Latitude: 37° 52.384′ S   (37.873071° S / 37° 52′ 23.06″ S)
Longitude: 144° 49.812′ E   (144.830199° E / 144° 49′ 48.72″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-17 16:41:45 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Seaholme Reef, Altona, 1,447 m, bearing 67°, ENE
Depth: 1 to 5 m.

Seaholme Reef, Altona

Reef Dive Shore access

Depth: 2 to 5 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

East of Altona Pier lies Seaholme Reef (also known as Wise's Reef) with many big boulders.

Latitude: 37° 52.090′ S   (37.868162° S / 37° 52′ 5.38″ S)
Longitude: 144° 50.728′ E   (144.845464° E / 144° 50′ 43.67″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-16 06:07:24 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Altona Pier, 1,447 m, bearing 247°, WSW
Depth: 2 to 5 m.

The Jawbone, Williamstown

Shore Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Marine Park - No Fishing Night Dive Site Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site

Depth: 2 to 6 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

West of the beach at Williamstown is a small promontory known as 'The Jawbone'. The eastern side of Jawbone is dominated by basalt boulders with encrusting worms and mussels. Numerous sea-stars and crabs inhabit the crevices, while shrimps and small fish dart amongst the weeds.

This site is located within the Jawbone Marine Sanctuary, which is the most northern marine sanctuary in Port Phillip Bay. Jawbone Marine Sanctuary, named after its shape, is located in Williamstown and protects 30ha of coastal waters. The little promontory, west of the beach at Williamstown, has been fenced off from the rest of the world for over 80 years by a coastal rifle range. This forgotten and unspoilt place is now considered a haven for coastal and marine life right next to Melbourne.

Nice site apart from walk down to the beach. In the shallows there is lots of seagrass with pipefish to be found nearly all of the time. Dumpling squid, wollongog bugs, sand octopuses, tiny seahorses, leatherjackets, zebrafish, clingfish and crabs have been spotted here.

More protected than Williamstown Beach Breakwater (Crystals), so a good site to dive instead when the wind is up. There is a wreck not far off shore as well, and there are many spots to dive here in all directions. The further south you go the deeper it gets and there are also colourful corals to be spotted here.

See also Jawbone Marine Sanctuary Park Notes, Parks Victoria: Jawbone Marine Sanctuary, and
Jawbone Marine Sanctuary Care Group.

Location: Williamstown
MELWAY Ref: Page 55 J10

Weather Required: Offshore winds (N, E, NE), or moderate fonshore winds (NW, S, SW, S, SE), protected from rain runoff.

Access: Long walk from Mullins Ct down track to the beach.

Facilities: Carpark on Mullins Ct. Lighting at night.

Latitude: 37° 52.037′ S   (37.86729° S / 37° 52′ 2.24″ S)
Longitude: 144° 53.021′ E   (144.883681° E / 144° 53′ 1.25″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-25 19:04:51 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Williamstown Beach Breakwater, 505 m, bearing 102°, ESE
Depth: 2 to 6 m.

Williamstown Beach Breakwater

Shore Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site

Location: Williamstown MELWAY Ref: Page 55 A11

Depth: 2 to 5 m.

Williamstown Beach Breakwater, also known as Crystals, near Williamstown, is great for a midweek dive as it's only about 25 minutes from Hawthorn. It has easy entry and exit and there are lots of critters to see.

If you head out from the stairs along the breakwater you will see more than if you head out into the more open area to the west of the breakwater. It can get very shallow the more west you head so the best strategy is to either enter via the beach and work your way around the breakwater or vice versa.

There are dozens of short headed seahorses if you pay close attention to the weeds, blue ring octopuses, many cushion sea stars (among other kinds) and tonnes of sea urchins (so check before you grab onto anything).

There are also short tailed nudibranches, decorator crabs and HEAPS of cardinal fish (especially at night). Old Wives, dumpling squid, stingarees, fiddler rays, clingfish and pygmy leatherjackets have also been seen.

Weather Required: Offshore winds (N, E, NE) or light onshore winds (NW, S, SW, S, SE), no rain runoff.

Access: Shore beach entry or entry via steps near break water, short walk to either entry from carpark.

Facilities: Toilets open until about 9-10pm near surf life saving club, parking ($2.70/hr or $10.80 all day 8am-8pm, machine takes credit card). Poor lighting at night.

Latitude: 37° 52.097′ S   (37.868282° S / 37° 52′ 5.82″ S)
Longitude: 144° 53.358′ E   (144.889295° E / 144° 53′ 21.46″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-17 21:20:12 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: The Jawbone, Williamstown, 505 m, bearing 282°, WNW
Depth: 2 to 5 m.

Point Gellibrand

Shore Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site

Depth: 2 to 5 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

Along the Port Phillip Bay side of Williamstown the shoreline is a continuous series of rock ledges and outcrops. The Point Gellibrand Rockpools, Battery Road, Williamstown, are initially shallow and rocky underfoot, but the bottom slowly deepens out into a broad area of reef. There is a good quantity of fish life out here including some very big colourful nudibranchs. It can be a very rewarding area for macro photography very close to the city of Melbourne.

Free parking at either end of Battery Road. The car park at the playground is closest for accessing the rock pools. This site is also known as Bunbury Rockpools.

Latitude: 37° 52.283′ S   (37.871381° S / 37° 52′ 16.97″ S)
Longitude: 144° 54.308′ E   (144.90514° E / 144° 54′ 18.5″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-26 17:49:33 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Gem Pier, 1,113 m, bearing 2°, N
Depth: 2 to 5 m.

Gem Pier

Pier Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site

Depth: 1 to 5 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

Gem Pier, in Williamstown, is one of Victoria's oldest marine constructions. The visibility is usually pretty dirty and with fine mud on the bottom you need to stay at least a metre above it.

Latitude: 37° 51.683′ S   (37.861378° S / 37° 51′ 40.96″ S)
Longitude: 144° 54.337′ E   (144.905623° E / 144° 54′ 20.24″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-15 23:16:18 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Point Gellibrand, 1,113 m, bearing 182°, S
Depth: 1 to 5 m.

Melbourne Aquarium

Other Shore access
Marine Park - No Fishing Open Water Rated
Melbourne Aquarium
Melbourne Aquarium
© Unknown

Depth: 4 to 7 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

Shark Dive at the Melbourne Aquarium

Experience the huge adrenaline rush of coming face-to-face with a shark! Take the plunge inside Melbourne Aquarium's 2.2 million litre Oceanarium. It's all part of an adventure where you'll encounter creatures of the deep and have an experience you'll never forget.

Take the plunge, dive in at the deep end for the ultimate challenge. Your thrilling underwater guided tour will bring you face-to-face with Grey Nurse and Sandbar Whaler Sharks, Giant Stingrays and hundreds of exotic fish.

Fully qualified instructors will ensure your dive is a thrilling, never-to-be forgotten experience! The dive is suitable for non-divers (a brief resort-style dive course is included) and certified divers.

More information...

Latitude: 37° 49.264′ S   (37.821061° S / 37° 49′ 15.82″ S)
Longitude: 144° 57.489′ E   (144.958158° E / 144° 57′ 29.37″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-16 02:56:55 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Kerford Road Pier, 3,255 m, bearing 191°, S
Depth: 4 to 7 m.

Kerford Road Pier

Pier Dive Shore access

Depth: 2 to 5 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

The piers of Port Melbourne interrupt the sandy beaches and these man made structures create interesting habitat for marine plants and animals.

Latitude: 37° 50.985′ S   (37.849746° S / 37° 50′ 59.09″ S)
Longitude: 144° 57.045′ E   (144.950752° E / 144° 57′ 2.71″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-15 23:26:03 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: St Kilda Pier, 2,276 m, bearing 136°, SE
Depth: 2 to 5 m.

St Kilda Pier

Pier Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated

St Kilda Pier is a suitable site for both snorkellers and divers. There is a surprising little ecosystem on the land break water. Lots of sea stars and baby fish call it home. Extensive seagrass beds surround the pier and provide a nursery area for many types of marine life.

Be careful of boats, jetskis and fishing lines. Please respect that there is a boat marina beside the pier.

Latitude: 37° 51.871′ S   (37.864512° S / 37° 51′ 52.24″ S)
Longitude: 144° 58.122′ E   (144.968698° E / 144° 58′ 7.31″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-26 22:44:35 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Kerford Road Pier, 2,276 m, bearing 316°, NW
Depth: 4 to 8 m.

Brighton Pier

Pier Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site

Depth: 2 to 8 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

This site is a good, safe controlled training area excellent for divers just getting into the sport. Head out past the Brighton Baths and across the sandy flats along the southern edge rock wall.

Park and gear up as close to the entry/exit point as possible as there is a very gentle and paved ramp leading right into the water from the car park if you wish to dive around the seabaths and the reef further out. To dive the breakwater you can enter from the first or second landing. It is better not to do a giant stride as the water is shallow, just climb down the ladder.

Under the pier there isn't much life around other than seastars. Out along the breakwater is quite nice with lots of nooks and crannies to find blennies, starfish, zebrafish, moonlighters, leatherjackets, seahorse and life similar to South Road. It is nice to ascend along the back wall to see a cool view of the CBD before heading back to the pier. You can combine diving the breakwater with the reef, if you reach the corner of the breakwater and swim out diagonally SW.

Best dived midweek, or as a night dive, when the car parking is easier.

Weather Required: The northern breakwater of the adjacent marina coupled with the shallow water to the north should offer protection from northerly winds. This site should also be diveable in easterlies and south easterlies and possibly north westerlies.

Facilities: Public toilets open during the day near the cafe. A parking fee is required at all times of the year including public holidays. Cost of parking is $3 for 1 hour or $5 for three hours. Parking ticket machine also accepts credit cards. There is good lighting at night.

Latitude: 37° 54.523′ S   (37.908713° S / 37° 54′ 31.37″ S)
Longitude: 144° 58.941′ E   (144.982345° E / 144° 58′ 56.44″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-17 16:50:09 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: South Road Reefs and Bommie, 2,301 m, bearing 164°, SSE
Depth: 2 to 8 m.

South Road Reefs and Bommie

Reef Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site
South Road Reefs and Bommie
South Road Reefs and Bommie
© James McKinnon

Depth: 2 to 6 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

Ideal Conditions:
The site is fine on a Northerly wind, or the slightest of Southerlies. But avoid Westerlies and strong Southerlies. Better conditions usually prevail in Summer and Autumn.

Car Parking:
Drive down South Road until you reach the beach, cross the railway lines and turn left and park in the car park immediately on your right. Then head down the steps and out through the gate in the concrete.

Access:
Head directly to the water and enter, as indicated in the picture.

Dive Route:
Head 240 degrees to the edge of the old baths (red line to the blue circled area). You can spend a good 40 minutes diving around the old baths.

From there, take a heading of 120 degrees to the reef (yellow line to the pink circle area). You can easily spend another 40 minutes diving around the natural reef.

What To Expect:
This is an excellent dive site for both night and day and very close to the Melbourne city centre. The inner reef is quite shallow, so watch out for stingrays.

Following a line straight out from the steps you will find a series of ridges and undercuts leading out to the bommie at 4 metres. Living on the bommie and surrounding reef are sea urchins, stingrays, snapper, seahorses and the occasional octopus.

Thanks to James McKinnon for the dive site map and updated description details.

Latitude: 37° 55.722′ S   (37.928703° S / 37° 55′ 43.33″ S)
Longitude: 144° 59.349′ E   (144.989143° E / 144° 59′ 20.91″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-03-05 23:09:37 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Francis Henty, 1,522 m, bearing 169°, S
Depth: 2 to 6 m.

Sandringham Pier Breakwater

Shore Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site

Depth: 0 to 6 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

The Sandringham Pier is a good spot for a shallow day or night dive. The pier itself is the best entry point for all divers.

Just around the end of the rocky breakwater itself lies the hulk of the cable layer Francis Henty in 3 to 5 metres of water.

At Sandringham Pier you'll also find the wreck of the HMAS J7 J-class submarine that was scuttled at Sandringham in August 1930 to form a breakwater. Because she swung around and sunk in the wrong direction, she eventually became incorporated into subsequent moorings.

Latitude: 37° 56.682′ S   (37.944705° S / 37° 56′ 40.94″ S)
Longitude: 144° 59.669′ E   (144.99449° E / 144° 59′ 40.16″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-26 22:56:42 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: J7 Submarine, 101 m, bearing 268°, W
Depth: 0 to 6 m.

Black Rock Jetty, Half Moon Bay

Pier Dive Shore access

Depth: 2 to 8 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

This is a good site for new divers. Around the Black Rock Jetty are small leather jackets, star fish, gobbleguts and the occasional seahorse. Half Moon Bay is the small sandy shallow area to the left of the car park. It is an excellent night dive especially in spring when the phosphorescence is at its brightest. At night you can find octopus, flathead and bull rays. Avoid during a southerly as the area can get quite choppy.

Also worth a note is the wreck of the HMVS Cerberus warship. Divers are now banned from the wreck as it is too dangerous, so please keep a distance away. The guns from the warship lie on the sandy bottom nearby.

Latitude: 37° 58.158′ S   (37.969295° S / 37° 58′ 9.46″ S)
Longitude: 145° 0.590′ E   (145.009838° E / 145° 0′ 35.42″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-14 22:49:32 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Cerberus, 274 m, bearing 321°, NW
Depth: 2 to 8 m.

Ricketts Point

Shore Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Marine Park - No Fishing Night Dive Site Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site

Depth: 2 to 8 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

Ideal Conditions:
Best dived in anything but a southerly. Just before high tide will give the clearest water.

What To Expect:
Ricketts Point Marine Sanctuary is a 115 hectare marine sanctuary located at Black Rock on the Eastern side of Port Phillip Bay.

Rickett's Point has easy access to a wide shallow reef. This is a great site for beginners and night dive enthusiasts. There are a number of separate dive sites along the cliffy foreshore. It's so close to the city, thus very convenient for those living in Melbourne. Great for getting back in the water, a night dive after work, or just an excuse to get wet!

The fish life is quite varied. Snapper, flathead, octopus and stingrays are seen here on a regular basis.

Entry is slightly west of the lookout via the beach below. Best direction to head is southeast towards the boat beacon to take you onto the edge of the reef. If you head further round the cliff it will take you to Table Rock (about 4-5 m of water), you can follow it right round to the sea wall if you like. Just make sure you have enough air. The surface swim back is much harder then underwater.

If you park across the road, be careful crossing the road in all you gear as the cars come past very quickly. Always take a dive flag!

See also Parks Victoria: Ricketts Point Marine Sanctuary, Ricketts Point Marine National Park Notes, and
Marine Care Ricketts Point.

Latitude: 37° 59.662′ S   (37.994362° S / 37° 59′ 39.7″ S)
Longitude: 145° 1.861′ E   (145.031022° E / 145° 1′ 51.68″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-25 19:16:02 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Table Rock Reef, 690 m, bearing 111°, ESE
Depth: 2 to 8 m.

Table Rock Reef

Shore Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site

Depth: 3 to 6 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

See also Ricketts Point Marine National Park Notes.

Latitude: 37° 59.798′ S   (37.996632° S / 37° 59′ 47.88″ S)
Longitude: 145° 2.301′ E   (145.038355° E / 145° 2′ 18.08″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-16 06:11:26 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Ricketts Point, 690 m, bearing 291°, WNW
Depth: 3 to 6 m.

Keefers Boatyard

Shore Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated

Level: Open Water and beyond.

An interesting dive, especially for the scrounge diver as there are bits and pieces in the area of the old Keefer's Boatyard jetty and the nearby Beaumaris Motor Yacht Squadron jetty.

There is likely to be small boat and dinghy traffic at this dive site, so tow a dive flag.

Latitude: 37° 59.475′ S   (37.991244° S / 37° 59′ 28.48″ S)
Longitude: 145° 2.594′ E   (145.043226° E / 145° 2′ 35.61″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-15 23:25:21 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Table Rock Reef, 736 m, bearing 215°, SW
Depth: 0 to 6 m.

Mordialloc Pier

Pier Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated

Depth: 2 to 6 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

Mordialloc Pier is fairly close to Melbourne and has similar life to Mornington Pier, but not nearly as interesting.

Heaps of blennies, seahorses, puffer fish, dumpling squid, calamari, starfish, blue ring octopuses, toadfish, jellyfish, and puffers.

The best way to do this pier is to enter off the lower landing, swim to the end of the pier, and then swim all the way back to shore. There is a lot of interesting reef around this pier to check out as well. When you get closer to shore you will find heaps of agro sand crabs running around the sand and the start of the pier is more interesting in general.

This is a good night dive site. It has a lot of dumped shopping trolleys making it a shopping trolley graveyard (where you can find seahorses in particular), and also lots of golf balls as the creek near here leads to a golf course.

Location: Mordialloc
MELWAY Ref: Page 92 E2

Weather Required: N or NE winds are best, or very light winds from other directions as quite exposed. No rain runoff.

Access: Can enter via shore or via lower landing.

Facilities: Toilets during the day, parking costs between 8am to 8pm. Lighting at night, tap to wash gear near where the yachts live.

Latitude: 38° 0.742′ S   (38.01236° S / 38° 0′ 44.5″ S)
Longitude: 145° 5.004′ E   (145.083405° E / 145° 5′ 0.26″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-17 23:48:48 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Aspendale Rec Reef, 2,704 m, bearing 192°, SSW
Depth: 2 to 6 m.

Frankston Pier

Pier Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated
Artificial reef at Frankston Pier
Frankston Pier

Depth: 3 to 6 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

Ideal Conditions:
Easterly winds and high tide.

What To Expect:
Entry points could be either lower landing, but if your taking the first lower landing option be prepared for some shallow depths initially (the possibility of crawling over sand banks). You may also have to do a short snorkel before you get some depth.

There's quite a bit of growth, both weed and sponges. Some natural and not so natural reef if common under Frankston pier like trolleys, tyres and random bits and pieces. None the less this creates homes for some Globe fish, crabs, rays, seahorses, 11 arm star fish and sea biscuits.

You'll find the most marine life if you stay under or very close to Frankston Pier. Not a huge amount of fish life but interesting and worth doing still. Nice one for on the way home from the Mornington Peninsula, or something a little closer to the city.

Don't forget to check out the artificial reef about 40 metres seaward of Frankston Pier.

There can be a bit of boat traffic around particularly in summer so be sure to take a dive flag. A small knife to cut line is always a good idea too and there is usually fisherman around.

Plenty of parking, though a walk involved. There is a small cafe close by and plenty a small drive away! Toilet blocks are around.

Latitude: 38° 8.730′ S   (38.145497° S / 38° 8′ 43.79″ S)
Longitude: 145° 6.778′ E   (145.112969° E / 145° 6′ 46.69″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-26 23:11:55 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Frankston Reef, Olivers Hill, 1,330 m, bearing 211°, SSW
Depth: 3 to 6 m.

Frankston Reef, Olivers Hill

Reef Dive Shore access

Depth: 2 to 6 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

Latitude: 38° 9.342′ S   (38.155693° S / 38° 9′ 20.49″ S)
Longitude: 145° 6.302′ E   (145.105026° E / 145° 6′ 18.09″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-15 23:14:39 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Frankston Pier, 1,330 m, bearing 31°, NNE
Depth: 2 to 6 m.

Pelican Point Reef

Shore Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site

Depth: 3 to 5 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

Pelican Point Reef is a pleasant and safe snorkelling and diving site, suitable for newcomers.

Latitude: 38° 9.733′ S   (38.162214° S / 38° 9′ 43.97″ S)
Longitude: 145° 5.441′ E   (145.090685° E / 145° 5′ 26.47″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-26 23:15:11 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Beacon Reef, Davey Bay, 291 m, bearing 234°, SW
Depth: 3 to 5 m.

Beacon Reef, Davey Bay

Reef Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site

Depth: 3 to 5 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

Beacon Reef is an underwater collection of tumbled rocks and slabs with lots of little holes and crannies that the small fish life love.

Latitude: 38° 9.824′ S   (38.163739° S / 38° 9′ 49.46″ S)
Longitude: 145° 5.279′ E   (145.087985° E / 145° 5′ 16.75″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-27 00:18:42 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Pelican Point Reef, 291 m, bearing 54°, NE
Depth: 3 to 5 m.

Ranelagh Beach

Shore Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site

Level: Open Water and beyond.

Ranelagh Beach in Mount Eliza is accessed from a track that leads down to the shacks on the beach from the carpark at the end of Earimil Drive. There are things to see at both ends of the beach. You ca also head out to Cahill's Reef, marked by a beacon.

Be careful of jet skis and other boating traffic. Best to tow a dive flag.

Latitude: 38° 10.683′ S   (38.178046° S / 38° 10′ 40.97″ S)
Longitude: 145° 4.582′ E   (145.076362° E / 145° 4′ 34.9″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-27 00:25:38 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Beacon Reef, Davey Bay, 1,888 m, bearing 32°, NNE
Depth: 0 to 6 m.

Mornington Pier

Pier Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated
Mornington Pier
Mornington Pier
© Unknown

Depth: 3 to 10 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

Ideal Conditions:
South to east winds and high tide.

What To Expect:
A whole variety of fish life here. Including old wives, globe fish, crabs, seahorses, starfish, squid, gurnards and other pylon dwelling creatures.

Mornington Pier is a regulary used dive training site and a relaxing after work night dive site for many Melbourne based divers. A site which is usually diveable when the wind is up.

Varied bottom depending on the area which means you wont get bored as it is changing the whole dive. Lots of large ledges and bolders, to sea grass covered rocks to silty mud. Lots of growth on rocks under the pier.

Abounds with sponge life, Pot Bellied Seahorses, Old Wives, Whiting, Morwong, Crabs, small Shrimp, and plenty of other small marine life.

Do be mindful here of the fisherman. There are usually a lot of them and the lines are littered everywhere. Be sure to take a knife just in case.

This is a great site for both day and night diving! The deepest of the piers on the Mornington Peninsula and well worth a visit. Depths can reach 10 metres out the end.

There is also a nice reef to the left of the pier you can follow along. To access it enter as you would for the pier and dive along the pier until the point the new structure starts. Cross through the pier here and you can follow a small reef along the edge of Snapper Point.

There are cafe and toilet facilities at Mornington Pier.

Entry/Exit: The best entry point is via a giant stride from the 3 metre high car park wall near the ladders. Alternatively you can lower your dive gear onto the stone ledge of the small boat inlet.

The best exit point is via the stone ledge. Get your gear onto the ledge. Climb onto the ledge and get your gear onto the top of the wall. Then climb the wall. It's easier if you work together with your dive buddy. Some divers prefer to climb one of the high ladders.

Make when making your way to the pier from the entry/exit points it's best to swim on the surface, ideally with an SMB, as there can be quite a bit of boat traffic.

Parking: Normally good, fee parking at entry point. If the car park is full you could be up for a 200 metre plus walk. If the car park is empty, it can be just a 4 metre walk to the water.

More information...

Latitude: 38° 12.761′ S   (38.212684° S / 38° 12′ 45.66″ S)
Longitude: 145° 2.016′ E   (145.033593° E / 145° 2′ 0.93″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-23 20:13:53 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Schnapper Point / Morninton Pier, 96 m, bearing 263°, W
Depth: 3 to 8 m.

Schnapper Point / Morninton Pier

Shore Dive Shore access

Depth: 10 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

Always great for rays, seahorses and giant cuttlefish.

More information...

Latitude: 38° 12.767′ S   (38.212777° S / 38° 12′ 46″ S)
Longitude: 145° 1.950′ E   (145.032496° E / 145° 1′ 56.99″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-16 06:06:42 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Mornington Pier, 96 m, bearing 83°, E
Depth: 10 m.

Royal Beach

Shore Dive Shore access

Depth: 10 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

Access is down a short scrambly sloped track opposite the end of Canterbury Street. Off the beach there is a wide rubble and rock strewn sea floor with small fish and crustaceans. A good beginner's dive.

Latitude: 38° 13.066′ S   (38.217763° S / 38° 13′ 3.95″ S)
Longitude: 145° 1.987′ E   (145.033114° E / 145° 1′ 59.21″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-16 06:04:49 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Schnapper Point / Morninton Pier, 557 m, bearing 354°, N
Depth: 10 m.

Fishermans Beach / Point Linley Reef

Reef Dive Boat access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site

Perfect dive for beginners!

Depth: 5 to 10 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

Ideal Conditions:
Winds from the south to east are ideal for this dive site.

What To Expect:
Best entry point is at the end of the car park at the boat ramp. Easiest to climb over a few rock, pop your fins on then swim over to the edge of the reef.

In Mornington, Point Linley Reef at Fisherman's Beach is a nice shore dive site. Once in if you follow round the point keeping the reef on your left you will find some nice life. If you swim out towards the marker pylon (northish) you will get a little more depth. Drops off to a depth of around 10 metres. Linley Reef is a series of boulders and slabs.

You're likely to see some goat fish, lots of starfish and sea stars, crabs, lots of sea urchins and little critters like the shrimp and some other small fish. Some seahorses and small cuttlefish have also been seen there. Plenty of boulders and weed, so some nice crevices to check out.

Make sure you're careful of boat and PWC (jet ski) traffic operating from the Fisherman's Beach boat ramp. Take a dive flag with you. There are sometimes a few fisherman on the point, so keep in mind their lines and you may want to take a knife just in case.

Entry/Exit: Enter over the rocks at the Western end of the Fisherman's Beach boat ramp area. You need to do a day inspection before tackling it at night. Best to go out along the North side of the reef. Then return along the South side.

When exiting you can go the same way you entered, or swim into the beach. If you're doing the latter make sure you swim on the surface (preferably with a flag or SMB!), so that you are seen by boats as you'll have to very carefully cross the boat channel by the ramp.

Parking: There isn't any parking at the boat ramp car park, but plenty in the dirt car parks at the top of the beach, or in nearby streets. There are toilet facilities further down the beach and a cafe across the road.

This could be a perfect little team up dive with Mornington Pier and Snapper Point.

Latitude: 38° 13.596′ S   (38.226605° S / 38° 13′ 35.78″ S)
Longitude: 145° 1.548′ E   (145.025807° E / 145° 1′ 32.91″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-15 22:31:10 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Marina Cove, 116 m, bearing 152°, SSE
Depth: 5 to 10 m.

Marina Cove

Shore Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site

Depth: 2 to 8 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

Marina Cove, Mornington, has a boulder strewn sea floor deepens gradually from 2 to 8 metres heading out from the shore. Small fish life and crustaceans.

Marina Cove is south of Point Linley, accessible from a track leading from the Esplanade opposite King George Avenue.

Latitude: 38° 13.652′ S   (38.227535° S / 38° 13′ 39.13″ S)
Longitude: 145° 1.585′ E   (145.026413° E / 145° 1′ 35.09″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-27 00:30:45 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Fishermans Beach / Point Linley Reef, 116 m, bearing 332°, NNW
Depth: 2 to 8 m.

Mount Martha - Deakin Drive

Shore Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site

Depth: 3 to 5 metres

Latitude: 38° 16.518′ S   (38.275304° S / 38° 16′ 31.09″ S)
Longitude: 145° 0.063′ E   (145.001056° E / 145° 0′ 3.8″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-16 03:00:15 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Mount Martha - Hearn Road, 822 m, bearing 217°, SW
Depth: 3 to 5 m.

Mount Martha - Hearn Road

Shore Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site

Depth: 3 to 5 metres

Latitude: 38° 16.871′ S   (38.281183° S / 38° 16′ 52.26″ S)
Longitude: 144° 59.720′ E   (144.995338° E / 144° 59′ 43.22″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-16 03:00:44 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Mount Martha - Deakin Drive, 822 m, bearing 37°, NE
Depth: 3 to 5 m.

Mount Martha - Burdoo Way

Shore Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site

Depth: 3 to 5 metres

Latitude: 38° 17.274′ S   (38.287897° S / 38° 17′ 16.43″ S)
Longitude: 144° 59.454′ E   (144.990894° E / 144° 59′ 27.22″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-16 02:59:41 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Mount Martha - Stanley Crescent, 638 m, bearing 218°, SW
Depth: 3 to 5 m.

Mount Martha - Stanley Crescent

Shore Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site

Depth: 3 to 5 metres

Latitude: 38° 17.544′ S   (38.292395° S / 38° 17′ 32.62″ S)
Longitude: 144° 59.182′ E   (144.986362° E / 144° 59′ 10.9″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-16 03:01:18 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Mount Martha - Ian Road, 318 m, bearing 211°, SSW
Depth: 3 to 5 m.

Mount Martha - Ian Road

Shore Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site

Depth: 3 to 5 metres

Latitude: 38° 17.690′ S   (38.294837° S / 38° 17′ 41.41″ S)
Longitude: 144° 59.068′ E   (144.984464° E / 144° 59′ 4.07″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-16 03:00:58 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Mount Martha - Stanley Crescent, 318 m, bearing 31°, NNE
Depth: 3 to 5 m.

Dromana Pier

Pier Dive Shore access

Depth: 3 to 10 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

Dromana Pier lies in quiet shallow water, which means depending on the tide as you may have to do a side-roll entry. If you Snorkel directly straight out of the pier for about 200 metres you will come across the pylons of the old jetty. At the end of these pylons there are some rail wheels they are recovered in sea weed now but even now still recognisable. For the fish life you can see fiddler rays, nudibranchs, leather jackets, stingrays, bay trout and a whole lot more.

Best place to find the deadly Blue Ring Octopus - don't touch them.

This is a nice short pier and can be great for training around.

Latitude: 38° 19.914′ S   (38.331906° S / 38° 19′ 54.86″ S)
Longitude: 144° 57.890′ E   (144.964837° E / 144° 57′ 53.41″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-14 16:30:08 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Mount Martha - Ian Road, 4,463 m, bearing 22°, NNE
Depth: 3 to 10 m.
-38 19.914
144 57.890
(WGS84)
Source: Google Earth

Rosebud Pier

Pier Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated

Level: Open Water and beyond.

Latitude: 38° 21.037′ S   (38.350613° S / 38° 21′ 2.21″ S)
Longitude: 144° 54.445′ E   (144.90742° E / 144° 54′ 26.71″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-17 15:06:19 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Rosebud Reef, 1,712 m, bearing 288°, WNW
Depth: 6 to 8 m.

Rye Pier

Pier Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated
Rye Pier
Rye Pier
© Unknown

Depth: 3 to 5 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

What To Expect:
Rye Pier is an excellent day and night dive site with max depth at around 5 metres. This is the place to go if you want to see Seahorses.

Rye Pier is a L-shaped pier approximately 500 metres long. Built about 1860 to service the lime trade. Points NNE so not diveable in strong N winds. A long walk to the lower landing (50m from end of pier). Much better at night as more things come out then. During the day can be fairly sparse.

The pylons are encrusted with marine growth so make sure to stop and have a good look around these. Also take your time to have a look in the tyres, as there are usually plenty of small critters hiding in there, often including some cleaner shrimp willing to give you a manicure.

Rye Pier is full of life and different every dive. You can find a Seal now and again, coming in from the seal colony on the Channel Marker. Spider Crabs in their thousands at the right time of year, Leatherjackets, Goatfish, Octopus (Sand, Keeled, Blue, Maori), Calamari, Dumpling Squid and Bottletail Squid in their dozens, Nudibranchs, Stargazers, lots of Seahorses (Pot Belly and Short Headed), schools of Pike during s ummer, Puffer Fish and Stingrays.

There are parts that must be nurseries as during certain times there are many baby critters here. You will see large Stingrays fairly often and you can see crowds gather on the pier to watch them swim around. Heaps of people fishing usually, so stay under the pier where the marine life is.

Watch out for fishing lines and carry a knife just in case. It's advised to stay between the pylons to avoid them.

There is also Elsa's Reef, a small artificial reef about 50 metres north from the end of Rye Pier. There is a sign and pickets leading to Elsa's Reef from the middle of the arm of the pier at the end that runs east. There is usually a large octopus hiding in the box and juvenile fish around. Nice for something different! Be careful when venturing from the pier as boats and jet skis are quite often above. Make sure you take a dive flag or SMB with you if you head that way.

There is also the wreck of the Eivion to the east, in about 3 metres. It can be spotted from up on the pier (about half way) as a dark patch. It is often home to many nudibranchs and rays. You can find shrimp and a variety of small fish. Something nice to change things up or to head to on a second dive.

Ideal Conditions:
Southerly winds and hight tide. Though high tide is ideal, you are able to dive it on any tide.

Weather Required: The following winds will be okay: N <15 knots, W <15 knots, S <15 knots, E <25 knots. Not current prone. Better at high tide to get more depth.

Entry/Exit: Entry can either be from the lower landing, or straight off the beach. Straight off the beach means crossing a large sandbank.

Be sure to take out a dive flag as there is often boat traffic. Over the summer holidays be very careful of PWC's (jet skis) as they come in very close to the pier and very quickly (despite rules and regulations). There is also often a para-sailing boat that comes in and out and moors to the lower landing. Be careful when entering and surfacing!

You can exit from the lower landing, but often a shore exit is nice as there is plenty to be seen south of the lower landing. Usually where we find many of the very cute seahorses.

Parking: Plenty of foods options here, plus a toilet block, and in winter plenty of car parks.

Rye Pier is also close to The Scuba Doctor Dive Shop. So please drop in and catch up with us before and/or after your dive.

More information...

Latitude: 38° 21.968′ S   (38.366125° S / 38° 21′ 58.05″ S)
Longitude: 144° 49.378′ E   (144.822961° E / 144° 49′ 22.66″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-23 20:23:16 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Eivion, 103 m, bearing 157°, SSE
Depth: 3 to 5 m.

Eivion

Wreck Dive Shore access

The wreck of the Eivion at Rye Pier, is historically significant as a Port Phillip Bay lime trader and for its association with its owner Benjamin Stenniken, the 'mayor' of Rye. It is archaeologically significant as the remains of the hull and cargo exhibit aspects of stowing of bagged lime, including the use of bulkheads and possibly limewashed holds to minimise water ingress to the vessel. As part of a maritime and terrestrial landscape it is in proximity to White Cliffs at Rye which produced lime and has remains of historic lime kilns. It is recreationally and educationally significant as the coherent remains of a wooden vessel within swimming distance from Rye Pier and lies in snorkelling depth.

In 1918, after a voyage from Melbourne to Rye, the Eivion encountered strong westerly winds and wave action whilst the vessel was alongside Rye Pier. The Eivion was pounded onto pier. After the storm, Eivion was awash with rigging tangled. Later dynamited to clear wreckage from pier.

The Eivion lies to the east of Rye Pier, in about 3 metres. It can be spotted from up on the pier (about half way) as a dark patch. It is often home to many nudibranchs and rays. You can find shrimp and a variety of small fish. Something nice to change things up, or to head to on a second dive at Rye Pier.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: Eivion.

Latitude: 38° 22.019′ S   (38.366981° S / 38° 22′ 1.13″ S)
Longitude: 144° 49.405′ E   (144.823419° E / 144° 49′ 24.31″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-15 22:24:29 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Rye Pier, 103 m, bearing 337°, NNW
Depth: 3 m.

Blairgowrie Pier

Pier Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated

The Best Pier Dive in Victoria!

Blairgowrie Pier
Blairgowrie Pier, © Unknown

Depth: 2 to 7 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

What To Expect: Blairgowrie Pier in Port Phillip, Victoria, is quite simply one of the best pier dives you can do anywhere in the world. It's a favourite dive site of photographers into maro shots.

Blairgowrie Pier is part of the Blairgowrie Yacht Squadron safe boat harbour and marina. There is a floating wall protecting the marina and the dive area.

Lots of sponge covered pylons. Once you come to the end of the pier turn left and dive along the breakwater (breakwater extends right for a short way, but it is basically L shaped). Fishermen can not access this part. It gets deeper with lots of dead shells and inside there is a mass of sponge.

Growth is excellent not only over the pylons but also over the steel sheet cladding on the side of the pier that serves to protect the yachts in the marina against waves and current. Thus it ends up almost being a wall dive instead of a typical pier dive.

Good as a night dive for Nudibranchs, Dumpling Squid, Southern Calimari Squid, Octopus, Seahorses, various molluscs, Cuttlefish, Spider Crabs (lots of them), Globe Fish, Leatherjackets, Stingarees, Banjo Sharks and sometimes large Stringrays. More fish nearer the end of the breakwater.

A long dive will allow you to cover the entire length of the jetty, then breakwater and return to the stairs.

Blairgowrie Pier is known for its nudibranchs! More than a hundred different species have been identified under Blairgowrie Pier. You will most times find several kinds in a variety of sizes and colours. Check out the Blairgowrie Nudibranchs group page on Facebook.

Blairgowrie Pier is also known for spider crabs. Each year from April through July thousands of spider crabs migrate along the ocean floor to cool, shallow waters. When the water temperature drops, things heat up as the spider crabs molt their shells and the mating season begins. As the crowd together for protection from predators like stingrays, seals and sharks, they sometimes begin to pile up in stacks around a metre high. It's quite a slight for divers. Rye Pier is also a place where this phenomenon can be seen.

But there is more to this site than nudi's and spider crabs. You'll find seahorses, box fish, large stingrays, decorator crabs, stargazers, invertebrate, goat fish, blennies, and a whole lot of colour.

Blairgowrie Pier has steel cladding to protect the yachts in the marina from waves and currents. This also makes for a protected dive site and a great home to lots of sponges and marine animals. Although the bottom is sandy, the pylons and this cladding are covered in colour and life. Along the left hand arm of the pier there is also a bit of a wall, which again is there to protect the yachts. It runs from the surface to about half way down and makes for bit of a wall dive on a pier.

If you slow down and take your time, you're bound to find so much life on Blairgowrie Pier. There are always comments about how the colour and the protection from current makes this site a nice easy dive. Best dived at slack (the period where the tide is not running). If the tide is running through you will feel it perpendicular to the pier. Please try to stay one metre off of the bottom, and don't touch, bump into, or fin kick the pylons or wall.

The marina beth area is a marine reserve and no take zone, though the fishermen on the pier seem to ignore this.

A very interesting and different dive to most piers. If you stay under the pier you shouldn't be troubled by the many fisherman here. But it's still recommended to take a knife just in case.

Weather Required: The following winds will be okay: N <15 knots, W <15 knots, S <15 knots, E <25 knots. Fairly protected however, so apart from having bad visibility the site should still be safe to dive when the winds are a bit stronger.

Similar to Portsea and Rye, southerly winds are the best no matter the strength. High tide will give you a bit more depth and hopefully some clean water. The sea wall means it's a little more protected here, so Blairgowrie Pier is often chosen over the other piers for this reason.

Ideal Conditions: Best dived at slack water as current moves fairly fast here perpendicular (across) to the pier and allows for more areas to be dived if the current is stopped. However even when the currents running you can still have a very good dive if you're careful and use the iron cladding on the side of the pier to sheild you from the current. One side of the pier has been blocked off with a thin wall running from the surface to half way to the bottom, the wall/cladding is covered in sponge life making it interesting to swim along this part up off the bottom in 2 metres of water out of the current. Best dived close to high tide as it is then deeper.

Entry/Exit: Once down on Blairgowrie Pier, head for the lower landing about 180 metres, or two-thirds of the way out. A giant stride entry from this landing entry is easiest, but a shore entry is also a possibility. Once in the water try to get under the pier fairly quickly as boats often moor to the landing.

Safety First: There are quite a few safety concerns at Blairgowrie Pier as it is a working marina. But the place to be is under the pier itself, so if you stay there you should be fine. This diver information safety sheet sums up the guidelines:
Blairgowrie Jetty Diver Safety Information (Adobe PDF | 144.45 KB)

Never swim beneath the berths and always keep a watchful eye for boats should you head out from under Blairgowrie Pier. Also be mindful of the slip which is on the outside of the pier and berthing areas. If you're not going to stay under the pier, always take a dive flag and make yourself visible on the surface to boats. There are always boats around, particularly on the weekend. It's ideal to stay beneath the pier whenever you can. Besides, that's where the interesting stuff is anyway.

Parking: There are two free car parking areas available.

The best place to park is in the Lower Car Park area, down the bottom of the cliffs, along the road leading into the yacht club, behind the bathing boxes. The yacht club people often try to claim this area as their own, but it's actually a public car park, so tell them to sod off!

The second parking area is the Upper Car Park, off Nepean Highway, just south of the pier, overlooking the marina. After gearing up, there are two sets of stairs down to the site. The Northern stairs in the upper car park have difficult access to the marina walk ways. We suggest you take the Eastern stairs on the far right which give better access to the walk ways. It saves you ducking under the pier and is slightly shorter — which all counts when your carrying so much gear.

Blairgowrie Pier is also close to The Scuba Doctor Dive Shop. So please drop in and catch up with us before and/or after your dive.

Blairgowrie Jetty Diver Safety Information

Blairgowrie Map by Brendon Edwards

More information...

Latitude: 38° 21.407′ S   (38.356778° S / 38° 21′ 24.4″ S)
Longitude: 144° 46.416′ E   (144.773597° E / 144° 46′ 24.95″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-06-13 05:13:46 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Bridgewater Bay, 2,012 m, bearing 196°, SSW
Depth: 2 to 7 m.

Sorrento Pier

Pier Dive Shore access
Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated

One of the best night dives in Melbourne.

Depth: 7 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

Ideal Conditions:
Your also going to want to dive here as close to slack water as possible because of how close Sorrento Pier is to a channel. It gets quite a lot of current. The dive site is very prone to strong currents, so plan ahead.

What To Expect:
Wait until the ferry stops for the day (usually 8:30 pm), then head straight out from where the ferry docks. You can dive under the pier but your likely to find the most interesting stuff on the pylons of the ferry terminal. That's why it's a must to make sure all the ferries have finished for the day!

Not often dived because of the restrictions and conditions required, but well worth it if you can get there for the night dive!

You need a permit to dive off the pier so it's a good idea to do a shore entry. You'll find weedy sea-dragons and great macro life also large Colony of Sponges over the pier's pylons. You may come across some old wives, flat head, squid, sometimes an eel and plenty of nudibranchs.

You may also find old bottles here. It is quite popular for divers to forage here for marble ones. Because of the sand movement and the ferry it often uncovers more bottles. Sorrento Pier was once popular with old bay steamers and visitors who would drop and throw empties from the pier. A good area to find bottles is often east of the ferry terminal.

There is a large car park here which makes it easy to get a park in winter. Ii's always busy in summer. There is a large range of cafes and pubs on the main street of Sorrento and public toilets in the car park.

Latitude: 38° 20.141′ S   (38.335677° S / 38° 20′ 8.44″ S)
Longitude: 144° 44.753′ E   (144.745887° E / 144° 44′ 45.19″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-27 00:35:35 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Sorrento Boat Moorings, 262 m, bearing 323°, NW
Depth: 0 to 7 m.

Sorrento Boat Moorings

Shore Dive Shore access
Inside Port Phillip Bay Open Water Rated

Depth: 2 to 15 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

The boat mooring area just out from the Sorrento Boat Ramp in Port Phillip Bay, Victoria.

More information...

Latitude: 38° 20.027′ S   (38.333778° S / 38° 20′ 1.6″ S)
Longitude: 144° 44.647′ E   (144.744111° E / 144° 44′ 38.8″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-24 20:05:18 GMT
Source: Google Earth. Approximate location only.
Nearest Neighbour: Sorrento Pier, 262 m, bearing 143°, SE
Depth: 2 to 15 m.

Point Franklin Reef

Reef Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site

Level: Open Water and beyond.

Depth: 0 to 15 metres.

Ideal Conditions:
Best at slack water, but experienced divers often work out the tides and tidal flows and plan a drift dive. tide times for Point Franklin are about 30 minutes behind the Rip / Heads times.

Running out from Point Franklin is a reef that reaches 15 metres in depth about 200 metres out from shore.

Franklin Point Reef is easily one of the most interesting and relatively east access dive sites you will find round the southern Mornington Peninsula area. Best dived on slack going to an ebb tide. This will allow for at least a 60 minute dive. When you feel the current head for shore. It is also possible to dive on slack for a flood tide but best to start at Portsea Pier and head towards the point. If you overshoot head for shore and exit at Shelley Beach.

There are at least three dive options to take:

  • First, just dive the point and even go down to the reported 15 metres depth at about 150 metres offshore;
  • Second, start the dive at Franklin Point, go out about 50 to 100 metres until you get to a set depth and then change course for the pier;
  • Third, start your dive anywhere along the beach, head out and return either to Portsea Pier, the point or back to the beach. This last option is probably the safest if diving the site the first time until you become familiar with it.

Remember to plan your dive with compass directions recorded first. Note that this is a high boat traffic area, particularly during the summer months, so always carry an SMB and launch it prior to surfacing. You can also carry a dive marker buoy.

Location: Portsea
MELWAY Ref: Page 156 E2

Weather Required: This is an exposed site to any wind with a northerly component and best dived in southerly winds. This is a tide affected area so rguably dived best on slack going to an ebb tide. It's also possible to dive on slack going to a flood but requires more planning in case you're swept eastwards by the current.

Access: From Portsea Beach. There is also access from Shelley Beach to the east but requires walking down (and up) stairs. Note that the beach walk is tiring and is about 430 metres from the pier. Stop frequently and rest before entering the water.

Facilities: Carpark is unrestricted during May to November and is 2 or 4 hourly December to April. Showers and toilets (showers are warm unless it is a busy day and people have used up the hot water). Dive shops within walking distance so air is easily available. Few shops for eating. BBQ facilities.

Latitude: 38° 19.104′ S   (38.318393° S / 38° 19′ 6.21″ S)
Longitude: 144° 43.166′ E   (144.719436° E / 144° 43′ 9.97″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-24 08:51:17 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Portsea Pier East Reef, 252 m, bearing 302°, WNW
Depth: 0 to 15 m.

Portsea Pier

Pier Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Night Dive Site Open Water Rated
Portsea Pier
Portsea Pier
© Unknown

Depth: 2 to 7 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

Ideal Conditions:
Southerly winds and high tide. Be mindful that since the channel dredging there can be a fair bit of surge if the site is dived during a running tide.

What To Expect:
Portsea Pier in Port Phillip Bay, Victoria is a popular location for dive schools, macro photographers, night divers, or anyone who just wants a shallow, relaxing dive. It is L shaped and is approx 300 metres (985 feet) in length.

This pier is one of the most dived in Melbourne. Great for training (very busy in the summer months) and always an abundance of marine life. Very popular for seeing Weedy Sea Dragons!

Under the pier there is plenty of light as the pier is only about 4 metres (13 feet) wide, with a bottom consisting of mostly sand and patches of kelp and grasses. At the very end of the pier, a large area of kelp can be found, it is here you can quite often find the elusive Weedy Sea Dragon. But beware of departing and arriving boats, as this is a public pier and the Portsea Ferry arrives regularly.

All sorts of interesting creatures from, small crabs and stars to the occasional blue ring octopus, shrimp, guppies and blennies on the pylons. On the bend in the pier schools of goat fish, weedy seadragons, sea hares and nudibranchs.

There is not a lot of growth on the pylons of the pier. This is not a dive to be rushed, typical dives here can last well over an hour, so take your time and have a good look around.

Portsea Pier is great for night dives. If you are doing this dive at night, watch out for Squid jig fisherman, and stay under the pier itself away from their lines. Speaking of fisherman, because it is such a popular spot to fish, you will find plenty of lead, sinkers, knives, jigs and other bits and pieces easily.

This is not just a dive for the novice, divers of any level can enjoy this dive. With a dive shop within a few minutes walk, it makes it a great dive site.

The pier is self navigable by the pylons. There are Banjo Sharks, Weedy Sea Dragons, Puffer Fish (as always), Biscuit Star Fish, soft corals and sponges. And for those who like to scavenge there are a few old tyres the left of the pier once you hit the parallel shore part of the pier. Many creatures have been found in those old tyres and old bottles to collect.

There are many scuba divers that think Portsea Pier has been somewhat ruined as a dive site by the Port Phillip deepening programme carried out by the Port of Melbourne in 2009. Since the dredging, the swells at Portsea Pier are more frequent and more intense. Indeed, the once lovely Portsea Beach has now been totally destroyed.

If you're around for a second dive here, there is also Portsea Reef about 50 metres to the West of the pier. Here you will young fish and little schooling fish, along with some small critters.

Many divers that have gone out on boat dives with the charter operators that utilise Portsea Pier, when they get back like to drop in for a pier or reef dive to use up their remaining air.

The site is ideal for multiple dives due to the surrounding facilities. There are toilets located in the park just before the pier, as well as BBQs and cafes.

Entry/Exit: Best from Shore as there is a reef in the shallows on the left hand side to look at on the swim out. Also you can do a giant stride from the lower landing about half way out, and another at the end.

There are several exits, including the shore, back up the ladder on the lower landing, or if you're up for it, a climb up any of the ladders along the pier, though they aren't short!

Safety First: Be mindful of the boat traffic here, it can often be quite hectic, particularly in summer. Never swim in the inside area of the pier for this reason.

Parking: Free parking after 6 pm at Portsea Pier around 50 metres from the pier with good street lights over your car. During the day and summer the car parks are hard to get with most being 1 to 2 hour limited.

More information...

Latitude: 38° 19.107′ S   (38.318444° S / 38° 19′ 6.4″ S)
Longitude: 144° 42.803′ E   (144.713389° E / 144° 42′ 48.2″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-23 20:21:09 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Portsea Cray Reef, 178 m, bearing 45°, NE
Depth: 2 to 7 m.

Quarantine Station

Shore Dive Shore access
Inside Port Phillip Bay Open Water Rated Slack Water

Level: Open Water and beyond.

Latitude: 38° 18.712′ S   (38.311874° S / 38° 18′ 42.75″ S)
Longitude: 144° 41.715′ E   (144.695252° E / 144° 41′ 42.91″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-24 19:55:41 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Quarantine Station Anchor, 574 m, bearing 14°, NNE
Dive only on: SWF, SWE.

Nepean Bay

Reef Dive Boat access
Ideal For Snorkelling Inside Port Phillip Bay Marine Park - No Fishing Night Dive Site Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site

Depth: 0 to 12 metres

Level: Snorkelling, Open Water and beyond.

Sheltered just to the North of Point Nepean inside Port Phillip is Nepean Bay. This is a lovely dive site with scattered reef, lots of fish and scattered wreck debris. The rocks at Point Nepean have brought many ships to grief over the years and the scattered wreckage lies in this bay. Sometimes covered in sand and other times exposed for exploration.

The area is also a marine park and as such the fish life is slowly rebuilding to the size it was before commercial and recreational fishing decimated it. It's lovely shallow clear water sheltered from all winds except northerlies make this a fantastic dive site for the end of the day.

This site lies in the Port Phillip Heads Marine National Park. The park is made up of six separate marine areas around the southern end of Port Phillip: Swan Bay, Mud Islands, Point Lonsdale, Point Nepean, Popes Eye, and Portsea Hole.

See also, Parks Victoria: Port Phillip Heads Marine National Park, and Port Phillip Heads Marine National Park - Map (PDF 1.4 MB).

Latitude: 38° 18.287′ S   (38.30479° S / 38° 18′ 17.24″ S)
Longitude: 144° 39.680′ E   (144.661325° E / 144° 39′ 40.77″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-27 21:29:52 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Empress of the Sea, 450 m, bearing 347°, NNW
Depth: 0 to 12 m.

 

Back Beaches and Cape Schank
— Point Nepean to Cape Schank

Probably the best shore diving in the whole of Victoria is diving the Back Beaches of the Nepean Peninsula. These dive sites are exposed to the seas of Bass Strait and the ocean swells which has resulted in a heavily eroded underwater landscape full of caves, tunnels, gullies, swim throughs and canyons crammed with oceanic fish and marine life. You'll find a range of fish hiding within this environment like wrasse, parrot fish, whiting, abalone, rays, wobegongs, port jackon sharks and more! There is also a lot of kelp cover around these areas.

However the swell, storms, massive waves and fierce rips make these sites highly dangerous for divers except in rare flat conditions. But as all of the local divers know, when the conditions are right, the diving is magnificent!

But these are tough dive sites not for the average diver, with real problems and serious consequences if you get it wrong. Don't underestimate the problems that lie in wait, or overestimate your own abilities when diving the Back Beaches.

Winds: Diving the Back Beaches is generally only possible after several days of no winds, or several days of prolonged northerly winds. These conditions flatten out the swells.

Tides: Make all of your entries on Low Tide, or 1 to 2 hours before Low Tide. Tidal ranges on the Back Beaches are in the order of several metres. Low Tide exposes the entry and exit rock platforms you need to use.

Surf and Swells: Looking at any of the Back Beach dive sites when the surf is pounding in should convince you to forget it and head for the calmer waters of Port Phillip Bay. Even on days when it seems the surf and swell is low, watch the sea for at least 20-30 minutes to see what happens.

Rips: All of the Back Beach dive site are rip prone. Swimmers and divers have been drowned at these sites. Australian Prime Minister Harold Holt died in wild surf conditions at Cheviot Beach on 17 December 1967. Be aware of rips in relation to your planned dive route and make sure you surface several times during the dive to make sure you're still on course.

Platforms and Exits: The limestone platforms of the Back Beach dive sites are separated by gullies which are usually the most protected entry and exit points. Before you begin your dive, locate a few exit point options just in case conditions change while you are underwater. Always return to shore with plenty of air in reserve. It could be vital if you experience difficult conditions while exiting, or get tangled in the kelp.

See also, Diving the Back Beaches.

London Bridge

Shore Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Open Water Rated Outside Port Phillip Bay Reef Dive Site

Depth: 5 to 7 metres

Level: Advanced Open Water and beyond

Always keep an eye on sea conditions throughout any dive on the Back Beaches. Please read the warnings on the web page Diving the Back Beaches before diving or snorkelling this site.

Latitude: 38° 19.783′ S   (38.329723° S / 38° 19′ 47″ S)
Longitude: 144° 41.515′ E   (144.691916° E / 144° 41′ 30.9″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-27 04:02:26 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Norwester, 151 m, bearing 232°, SW
Depth: 5 to 7 m.

Sorrento Back Beach

Reef Dive Shore access
Crayfish Dive Site Ideal For Snorkelling Open Water Rated Outside Port Phillip Bay Reef Dive Site

Depth: 2 to 20 metres

Level: Advanced Open Water and beyond

Ideal Conditions:
The sea needs to be flat with no swell..

What To Expect:
Out through Port Phillip Heads past Point Nepean lies the Sorrento Back Beach. Although some of this area can be dived as a shore dive a lot can't. It's these areas we venture to in order to explore the lovely reefs and rocky outcrops. Usually a haven for Crayfish, snapper and other lovely edible and photogenic critters. A great dive when the seas are calm and the wind has blown from the north for a few days.

The three main dive sites from the shore at Sorrento Back Beach are:

  1. the platforms by the headland,
  2. a reasonable snorkel southwards out to the areas around Darby Rock, or
  3. after a 10-15 minute walk around the coastline to the west, the enclosed gullies at Sphinx Rock.

The walk at Sorrento Back Beach is slightly easier then many of the other back beach dives. Though during the summer months it gets really busy as lots of families bring down the kids to swim in the large artificial rock pool. Go early to get a decent park!

Be sure to always take a dive flag and a knife. You might also want to take a catch bag down here too! Be sure to always carry a measuring device too as the rangers have been known to join you in the water as well as wait on shore.

It is recommended to dive here the first time with someone who is familiar with the area and has dived here before. And to be aware of the walks involved. It's not for the unfit!

Always keep an eye on sea conditions throughout any dive on the Back Beaches. Please read the warnings on the web page Diving the Back Beaches before diving or snorkelling this site.

Latitude: 38° 20.757′ S   (38.345956° S / 38° 20′ 45.44″ S)
Longitude: 144° 43.619′ E   (144.726981° E / 144° 43′ 37.13″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-27 04:12:32 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: St Pauls Rock, 946 m, bearing 138°, SE
Depth: 6 to 20 m.
Dive only on: SWF, SWE, Ebb, Flood.

St Pauls Rock

Shore Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Open Water Rated Outside Port Phillip Bay Reef Dive Site

Depth: 5 to 6 metres

Level: Advanced Open Water and beyond

St Paul's Rock, at the end of St Paul's Road, is west of the small beach and has a nice swim through tunnel running underneath.

Always keep an eye on sea conditions throughout any dive on the Back Beaches. Please read the warnings on the web page Diving the Back Beaches before diving or snorkelling this site.

Latitude: 38° 21.138′ S   (38.352292° S / 38° 21′ 8.25″ S)
Longitude: 144° 44.053′ E   (144.734219° E / 144° 44′ 3.19″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-27 04:15:04 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Jubilee Point, 361 m, bearing 157°, SSE
Depth: 5 to 6 m.

Jubilee Point

Reef Dive Boat access
Ideal For Snorkelling Open Water Rated Outside Port Phillip Bay Reef Dive Site

Depth: 5 to 10 metres

Level: Advanced Open Water and beyond

The Jubilee Point dive site is in the area of Jubilee Point on the Back Beaches of Nepean Peninsula out in Bass Strait, Victoria. There are many curving gutters and alley ways around the reefs.

This is a very dangerous place in the wrong conditions. It's very important to keep an eye on the sea conditions throughout the dive as they could change quickly.

Always keep an eye on sea conditions throughout any dive on the Back Beaches. Please read the warnings on the web page Diving the Back Beaches before diving or snorkelling this site.

Latitude: 38° 21.317′ S   (38.355278° S / 38° 21′ 19″ S)
Longitude: 144° 44.150′ E   (144.735833° E / 144° 44′ 9″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-27 04:14:36 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: St Pauls Rock, 361 m, bearing 337°, NNW
Depth: 5 to 10 m.

Diamond Bay

Shore Dive Shore access
Advanced Open Water Rated Ideal For Snorkelling Outside Port Phillip Bay Reef Dive Site

Depth: 4 to 10 metres

Level: Advanced Open Water and beyond

Ideal Conditions:
As an ocean beach Diamond Bay is affected by rips, currents, swell and strong winds and can be very dangerous. To dive here there must be very little to no swell and if any winds, a northerly. Be aware that conditions here can change very quickly also.

What To Expect:
First off, to get to this dive site, which is amazing and not often dived, there is a bit of a walk. Over sand dunes and down stairs, so this may not be for everyone, but if you have a good set of legs on you it is well worth it. It's about 130 m from the car park with the last 50 metres consisting of stairs and a walk across the soft sand of the beach.

It has many rock ledges and overhangs, kelp beds, reefs and small walls. In these is a variety of life including the odd crayfish! You'll also find old wives, boarfish, abalone, and schooling fish.

Another thing to be mindful is of the visibility, it can change quite quickly with the swell as its a sandy bottom. It advisable to go with someone who has been before also to come to the surface to check conditions and for navigational purposes every once in a while.

Now you can walk straight in from the stairs though you'll probably find more and avoid just looking at sand if you head over to side and swim towards either point. Once you get about half way along the bay is where the dive really starts and also begins to deepen. You'll find some bommies and kelp forest just before the point on the right hand side — the direction usually taken.

Diamond Bay is a spectacular dive site but not often diveable. This site is more protected than other Back Beach dive sites so when others are too rough this site can be okay.

Awesome looking landscape with lots of kelp, gullies, interesting rock formations and overhangs due to the surf pounding at the rocks. Not much macro life but you can find lots of crayfish and abalone (so bring measuring device if you want to catch some), wrasse, sharks including catsharks and Port Jacksons and lots of leatherjackets.

Viz can be bad close to shore but clears up the further out you go if the weather is good. Weather can turn bad quickly so it can be helpful to check on conditions now and again throughout the dive. There are often rock fisherman on the east side of the bay on the cliff face or shallow rock ledge on the west so beware of their fishing lines.

If you're lucky enough to dive here on the right day everyone will be jealous. There aren't many facilities here so make sure you have everything you need including dive flag, knife, SMB and possibly a catch bag!

Access: Via shore down steep stairs from carpark.

Facilities: Free park - fairly small so busy in summer.

Weather Required: Very little swell (less than 6 ft, with periods of 10s or more) which generally means 3-4 days of N to NE winds prior to diving here.

Location: Sorrento Back Beaches
MELWAY Ref: Page 156 B12.

Always keep an eye on sea conditions throughout any dive on the Back Beaches. Please read the warnings on the web page Diving the Back Beaches before diving or snorkelling this site.

Latitude: 38° 21.246′ S   (38.354105° S / 38° 21′ 14.78″ S)
Longitude: 144° 44.534′ E   (144.742234° E / 144° 44′ 32.04″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-27 04:01:18 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Jubilee Point, 573 m, bearing 256°, WSW
Depth: 4 to 10 m.

Spray Point Caverns

Shore Dive Shore access
Advanced Open Water Rated Ideal For Snorkelling Outside Port Phillip Bay Reef Dive Site

Depth: 5 to 15 metres

Level: Advanced Open Water and beyond

Should only be dived by experienced divers with plenty of fitness and strength, even on calm days.

Always keep an eye on sea conditions throughout any dive on the Back Beaches. Please read the warnings on the web page Diving the Back Beaches before diving or snorkelling this site.

Latitude: 38° 22.088′ S   (38.368125° S / 38° 22′ 5.25″ S)
Longitude: 144° 45.230′ E   (144.753832° E / 144° 45′ 13.8″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-27 04:15:36 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Bridgewater Bay, 1,319 m, bearing 120°, ESE
Depth: 5 to 15 m.

Bridgewater Bay

Shore Dive Shore access
Advanced Open Water Rated Ideal For Snorkelling Outside Port Phillip Bay Reef Dive Site

Depth: 4 to 8 metres

Level: Advanced Open Water and beyond

From the carpark at the end of St John's Wood Road, you take the track east to Bridgewater Bay. At the eastern end of Bridgewater Bay is 'The Bridge'. At the western end is Graham's Reef which leads you further west around Koreen Point and to Fowler's Beach.

Always keep an eye on sea conditions throughout any dive on the Back Beaches. Please read the warnings on the web page Diving the Back Beaches before diving or snorkelling this site.

Latitude: 38° 22.446′ S   (38.374098° S / 38° 22′ 26.75″ S)
Longitude: 144° 46.014′ E   (144.766899° E / 144° 46′ 0.84″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-27 05:31:58 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Pearses Beach, 919 m, bearing 139°, SE
Depth: 4 to 8 m.

Pearses Beach

Shore Dive Shore access
Advanced Open Water Rated Ideal For Snorkelling Outside Port Phillip Bay Reef Dive Site

Depth: 3 to 10 metres

Level: Advanced Open Water and beyond

Always keep an eye on sea conditions throughout any dive on the Back Beaches. Please read the warnings on the web page Diving the Back Beaches before diving or snorkelling this site.

Latitude: 38° 22.824′ S   (38.380396° S / 38° 22′ 49.43″ S)
Longitude: 144° 46.423′ E   (144.773723° E / 144° 46′ 25.4″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-27 04:16:16 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Bridgewater Bay, 919 m, bearing 319°, NW
Depth: 3 to 10 m.

Number Sixteen

Shore Dive Shore access
Advanced Open Water Rated Ideal For Snorkelling Outside Port Phillip Bay Reef Dive Site

Depth: 5 metres

Level: Advanced Open Water and beyond

Reach by driving down the coastal extension of Canterbury Jetty Road to the car park.

To the west of the beach there is a series of ledges and gullies dropping off a wide platform, and access is straight off the edge.

Always keep an eye on sea conditions throughout any dive on the Back Beaches. Please read the warnings on the web page Diving the Back Beaches before diving or snorkelling this site.

Latitude: 38° 23.567′ S   (38.392783° S / 38° 23′ 34.02″ S)
Longitude: 144° 47.369′ E   (144.789483° E / 144° 47′ 22.14″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-27 04:12:57 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Craigburn, 373 m, bearing 238°, WSW
Depth: 5 m.

Cape Schank West

Shore Dive Shore access
Advanced Open Water Rated Ideal For Snorkelling Outside Port Phillip Bay Reef Dive Site

Depth: 4 to 7 metres

Level: Advanced Open Water and beyond

Cape Schank is one of the more epic shore dives in Victoria. You will be walking nearly one kilometre from the carpark to the dive site, plus you'll be carrying your dive gear 100 metres down and then back up at the end.

From the entry point at the end of the point you'll swim around the Cape in the channel between Pulpit Rock. As you work your way up the western side you'll find big gullies, gorges and bommies and a rocky bottom.

Always keep an eye on sea conditions throughout any dive on the Back Beaches. Please read the warnings on the web page Diving the Back Beaches before diving or snorkelling this site.

Latitude: 38° 29.762′ S   (38.496031° S / 38° 29′ 45.71″ S)
Longitude: 144° 53.165′ E   (144.886081° E / 144° 53′ 9.89″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-27 04:16:41 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: The Blowhole, 9,176 m, bearing 82°, E
Depth: 4 to 7 m.

 

Flinders and Westernport Bay
— Flinders to Hastings

The Blowhole

Shore Dive Shore access
Advanced Open Water Rated Ideal For Snorkelling Outside Port Phillip Bay Reef Dive Site

Depth: 3 to 11 metres

Level: Advanced Open Water and beyond

The Blowhole is an accessible shore site between Cape Schank and Flinders.

Latitude: 38° 29.101′ S   (38.485013° S / 38° 29′ 6.05″ S)
Longitude: 144° 59.434′ E   (144.990563° E / 144° 59′ 26.03″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-27 02:18:22 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Mushroom Reef, 2,290 m, bearing 80°, E
Depth: 3 to 11 m.

Mushroom Reef

Shore Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Marine Park - No Fishing Open Water Rated Outside Port Phillip Bay Reef Dive Site

Mushroom Reef Marine Sanctuary

Depth: 6 to 8 metres.

Mushroom Reef site is much like the Back Beach dives over Portsea/Sorrento way. It is located near Flinders Pier, but is quite exposed. Can be a lot of surge even on calm looking days.

The landscape is quite nice and there are lots of cool leatherjackets and marine life similar to Diamond Bay and St. Paul's.

Named for its mushroom shaped reef, this site is a part of the Mushroom Reef Marine Sanctury which protects 80ha of the open coast of Flinders on the Mornington Peninsula. Composed of sandstone rock platforms extending from the shore, the park includes sheltered rock pools, coves and a shallow reef on the ocean side. The reef is formed from ancient basalt which has weathered beautifully, allowing creatures to hide within crevices and cracks or under loose rocks.

This area is famous for its diversity of marine life and has attracted scientists for over 100 years. The intertidal soft sediment is an important feeding and roosting habitat for many birds. When searching the rockpools one can find many crabs, multicoloured cushion seastars, numerous species of snails and delicate anemones.

The seafloor (2-3m) is covered with canopy forming brown algae and patches of seagrass which attract many species of fish such as morwongs, wrasse, cowfish and Victoria's marine emblem, the Weedy Seadragon. If you're lucky you may be able to spot a Black and White Seastar. This amazing creature is one of only two seastars known to brood its young in its stomach.

See also, Parks Victoria: Mushroom Reef Marine Sanctury,
Mushroom Reef Marine Sanctuary - Park Note (PDF 353.2 KB), and
Mushroom Reef Marine Sanctuary Map (Adobe PDF | 159.25 KB).

Location: Flinders
MELWAY Ref: Page 261 K11

Access: Entry via shore after short walk from the carpark down the stairs.

Facilities: Free car park at all times. No toilet and no rubbish bins for litter.

Latitude: 38° 28.894′ S   (38.48157° S / 38° 28′ 53.65″ S)
Longitude: 145° 0.990′ E   (145.016506° E / 145° 0′ 59.42″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2018-01-18 00:11:17 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-18 09:23:22 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Flinders Back Beach, 238 m, bearing 142°, SE
Depth: 6 to 8 m.

Flinders Back Beach

Shore Dive Shore access
Advanced Open Water Rated Ideal For Snorkelling Marine Park - No Fishing Outside Port Phillip Bay Reef Dive Site

Depth: 4 to 8 metres

Level: Advanced Open Water and beyond

Latitude: 38° 28.996′ S   (38.483266° S / 38° 28′ 59.76″ S)
Longitude: 145° 1.090′ E   (145.018169° E / 145° 1′ 5.41″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-18 00:16:18 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Mushroom Reef, 238 m, bearing 322°, NW
Depth: 4 to 8 m.

Point Leo

Shore Dive Shore access
Advanced Open Water Rated Ideal For Snorkelling Outside Port Phillip Bay Reef Dive Site

Depth: 3 to 8 metres

Level: Advanced Open Water and beyond

Latitude: 38° 25.651′ S   (38.427513° S / 38° 25′ 39.05″ S)
Longitude: 145° 4.549′ E   (145.075815° E / 145° 4′ 32.93″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-16 03:09:40 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Flinders Pier, 6,824 m, bearing 218°, SW
Depth: 3 to 8 m.

Flinders Pier

Pier Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Night Dive Site Open Water Rated Outside Port Phillip Bay

Flinders Pier is the Weedy Seadragon capital of the world!

Flinders Pier
Flinders Pier
© Unknown

Depth: 3 to 6 metres

Level: Open Water and beyond.

Ideal Conditions:
Flinders Pier is the perfect alternative when the Port Phillip is blown up with northerly's. Its protected from these winds and is best done on high tide. There is very little depth at low tide.

What To Expect:
Along with Blairgowrie Pier, Flinders Pier, located just inside Westernport Bay, would be one of the most popular shore dives in the state. Mainly because of its population of the Weedy Sea dragons that it's now famous for.

The BBC Natural History Film Unit spent three weeks at Flinders Pier in January 2016 to get footage of Weedy Seadragons for Blue Panet II. There are dozens of them here and during the right season you might see them carrying eggs around.

It's not uncommon to encounter seals here. They like to play with you by swimming straight at you, which is spooky in low viz. There are also large Stingrays that circle the pier. Leafy Seadragons have been spotted here by a couple of people (and photographed) but this is a very rare find.

Many species of marine life can be found under Flinders Pier including but not limited to obviously to the weedy sea dragon. You will often find cuttlefish, large smooth rays and eagle rays, crabs and plenty of other little fish and critters. You'll often also see a Banjo shark or two. Visibility is generally quite good and can make for some excellent underwater photography opportunities.


"Into the Dragon's Lair", a short video featuring the Weedy Seadragons of Flinders Pier by Sheree Marris author of Melbourne Down Under.

Flinders Pier is quite a bit different to the piers on the Mornington Peninsula. It's a grass bottom with plenty of colour, sponges and life on the pylons too, which is a bit of a change to the sand bottom of the Port Phillip Bay pier dives. This is why is such a perfect home for the Weedy's and why they are everywhere here!

Weather Required: All winds other than strong E or NE winds. If the ocean is rough, there most likely will be surge and poor viz. High tide is better as tide movement is 1.5 metres. Best dived at slackwater, or on an incoming Western Port tide. The viz will be best when there has been no recent rain.

Flinders Pier is often a perfect alternative when Port Phillip Bay isn't its best.

Entry/Exit: It is a long pier with many ladders and step platforms to allow for easy entry/exit points. Entry is easiest from the lower landing, that at high tide can be often covered by water. You can also come in from the shore.

Exit can be either shore, or the same as the entry, which again at high tide is covered and makes it easy to get up. You can avoid ladders and swim right onto it and stand right up!

Facilities: There are toilet facilities here and a cafe is up the road. There is however not a dive shop in the immediate area, so if your planning a double dive make sure you have adequate air before you head down. The Scuba Doctor dive shop in Rye is a short, scenic, half an hour dive from Flinders Pier. Still close enough if you've forgotten a fin or weight belt or want an extended interval and an air fill!

Safety First: As usual on pier dives there will be fisherman so make sure you have a knife handy for any snags or a tangled squid jig or two. A dive flag is also a must so others know you're there. There is often a few boats around so be careful of those and mindful when surfacing.

More information...

Latitude: 38° 28.534′ S   (38.475562° S / 38° 28′ 32.02″ S)
Longitude: 145° 1.624′ E   (145.027069° E / 145° 1′ 37.45″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-03-05 04:30:27 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Mushroom Reef, 1,137 m, bearing 233°, SW
Depth: 3 to 6 m.

Stony Point Pier

Shore Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Open Water Rated Outside Port Phillip Bay

Depth: 5 to 9 metres

Latitude: 38° 22.331′ S   (38.372175° S / 38° 22′ 19.83″ S)
Longitude: 145° 13.471′ E   (145.224516° E / 145° 13′ 28.26″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-16 06:10:48 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Hastings Pier, 7,453 m, bearing 342°, NNW
Depth: 5 to 9 m.

Hastings Pier

Pier Dive Shore access
Ideal For Snorkelling Night Dive Site Open Water Rated Outside Port Phillip Bay

Depth: 3 to 5 metres

Latitude: 38° 18.491′ S   (38.308187° S / 38° 18′ 29.47″ S)
Longitude: 145° 11.944′ E   (145.199073° E / 145° 11′ 56.66″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-15 23:18:57 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Stony Point Pier, 7,453 m, bearing 162°, SSE
Depth: 3 to 5 m.

Other Resources

Some of the books that will help you to get to know what scuba diving is on offer in Melbourne include:

Melbourne Down Under

Melbourne Down Under by Sheree Marris
Melbourne Down Under
© Sheree Marris

"Melbourne Down Under
The Jewels of Port Phillip Bay"
Author: Sheree Marris
Published: Sheree Marris
ISBN: 9780980774009

Sheree Marris, a former Young Australian of the Year (Environment) and award-winning aquatic scientist, reveals the city's best kept secret, Port Phillip Bay - a stunning marine environment with colour and diversity to rival any tropical reef. Vibrant sponge gardens, towering forests of kelp, fish that fly, birds that swim and dragons that sparkle like jewels, are some of the treasures you can expect to find.

Starring the fabulous marine environments of:

  • Mornington Peninsula Shire
  • City of Greater Geelong
  • Hobsons Bay City Council
  • Wyndham City
  • Frankston City
  • City of Port Phillip
  • Borough of Queenscliff
  • Bayside

Shore Dives of Victoria

Bass Strait is a 200 kilometres (124 miles) "funnel" for the great Southern Ocean as it surges through between Victoria and Tasmania to join the Pacific Ocean to the east. Along the Victorian coastline of Bass Strait, scuba divers can choose from more than 120 shore dives, giving an outstanding variety of experiences:

  • capes and headlands
  • major bays
  • dozens of offshore reefs (limestone, sandstone and basalt)
  • a great variety of temperate marine life (including abalone and crayfish)
  • easily accessible jetties and piers
  • shipwrecks and hulks
  • sea caves, blowholes, some tricky drifts
  • many safe night dives and introductory day sites for newly qualified divers to enjoy developing their dive skills
Shore Dives of Victoria by Ian Lewis
Shore Dives of Victoria
© Ian Lewis

There is much to learn and enjoy as you shore dive Victoria's coastline.

The best reference book on these shore dives is:
"Shore Dives of Victoria"
Author: Ian Lewis
Published: 2008 by Oceans Enterprises
ISBN: 9780958665780

This book is a comprehensive guide to over 120 scuba diving and snorkelling dive sites accessible from shore along the Victorian coast, with maps and charts.

Acknowledgements

A resource such as this doesn't get built without the support, assistance or inspiration from plenty of other divers along the way. We'd like to acknowledge the following divers in particular: Ian Lewis, Peter Stone, Sheree Marris, Andrew Newton, Peter Fuller, John Gaskell, Christopher Smith, Evan Coker, Brendan Edwards, Alan Beckhurst, Mary Malloy, David Bryant, Scott Grimster, Michael Mallis, Phil Watson, David Reinhard, John Lawler and Lloyd Borrett. Plus the staff and customers of The Scuba Doctor.

Melbourne Shore Dive Locations

You can see where the popular Melbourne and Victorian shore dive locations are via our Melbourne Dive Sites Map. The GPS marks for these shore dives are also listed on our Melbourne Dive Site GPS Marks page.

Suunto EON Core at The Scuba Doctor Dive Shop