Melbourne Wreck Dives

Does wreck diving stir your sense of adventure?

Diving the Ships' Graveyard, Victoria, Australia
Diving Victoria's Ships' Graveyard
© Mary Malloy & Alan Beckhurst

Melbourne, Victoria, Australia has a rich maritime history. This has resulted in more than 800 ships coming to grief in Victoria waters with only about 30% of them having been found. Plus, there is an extensive Ships' Graveyard of scuttled shipwrecks south of Melbourne in Bass Strait, not far from the entrance to Port Phillip Bay and the Port of Melbourne.

ex HMAS Canberra Warship


Join seals, seahorses and stingrays on a dive below the waves of Bass Strait. Explore the decks and galleys of the wrecked HMAS Canberra — Victoria's first artificial reef created for the sole purpose of diving.

HMAS Canberra FFG 02 in 2002
HMAS Canberra FFG 02 bow on
© Department of Defence

The ex HMAS Canberra dive site is the first artificial reef specifically created for diving in Victoria. It lies in approximately 28 metres of water, with the top of the mast about 5 metres below the surface at low tide. The site provides opportunities for divers with varying levels of experience and certification, from open water level certificates to advanced wreck divers, to enjoy this site.

You can learn more about the ex HMAS Canberra on the following web pages:

Parks Victoria Dive Site Maps
Parks Victoria Dive Site Maps
© Parks Victoria
Divers are able to access the superstructure of all decks. Highlights are the junior mess mural, the captain's cabin, the bridge, galley, mess decks and operations room. These areas have been left as intact as possible to create additional interest for divers, plus nooks and crannies for creatures. Please note that this can make the dive more challenging. Please don't scavenge from the ex HMAS Canberra. It's illegal. Plus, if you do, it won't be long before you destroy the thing you came to see.

Parks Victoria Scuttling Survey
Parks Victoria Scuttling Survey
© Parks Victoria
To see the whole 138 metres (453 feet) long, 14.3 metres (47 feet) beam, 4,100 tonne (4,519 short tons) displacement ex HMAS Canberra FFG-02 ship, you'll want to do at least 20 dives, but you can certainly get a feel for the majesty of the wreck after even a few dives.

Victoria's Ships' Graveyard

South of Melbourne there is a Ships' Graveyard. It's located 7 kilometres (4.3 miles) east of Torquay's Fisherman's Beach through to Point Lonsdale. There are 46 known wrecks to choose from. They consist of tugs, dredges, barges, lighters, coastal freighter, World War One submarines, a paddle steamer plus a patrol boat. Many of these vessels were stripped down and scuttled by an explosive charge or an opened valve cock, and many remain fairly intact to this day.

Victoria's Ships' Graveyard
Victoria's Ships' Graveyard
© Scuttlebutt Press

These vessels were decommissioned from the early 1900s through to 1999 and range in depth from 30 metres (98 feet) to 82 metres (269 feet). Penetration can be had on some wrecks, and there is little tidal current or shipping to be concerned with so wrecks can be dived at any time of the day. The main constraints are wind strength and the size of the swell.

The best reference work on these wrecks is:
"Victoria's Ships' Graveyard"
Authors: Mark Ryan, Peter Taylor & Mick Whitmore
Published: 2009 by Scuttlebutt Press
ISBN: 9780980590203

Note: Click on images to see larger versions.


Auriga

Auriga
Auriga
© Unknown

3 Masted Iron Barque | Max Depth: 57 metres (187 feet)

Built in 1869 and scuttled on 5 February 1930, the overall length of the vessel was approximately 50.1 metres (164 feet), beam 8.6 metres (28 feet) and draught 5.3 metres (17 feet) with a displacement weight of 490 tonne (540 short tons).

Latitude: 38° 20.771′ S   (38.346175° S / 38° 20′ 46.23″ S)
Longitude: 144° 34.210′ E   (144.57016833° E / 144° 34′ 12.61″ E)

Datum: WGS84

Batman

Batman
Batman
© Unknown

Steam Hopper Barge | Max Depth: 46 metres (151 feet)

Built in 1883 and scuttled on 21 May 1935, the overall length of the vessel was approximately 47.7 metres (156 feet), beam 8 metres (26 feet) and draught 3.7 metres (12 feet) with a displacement weight of 352 tonne (388 short tons).

Latitude: 38° 21.306′ S   (38.3551° S / 38° 21′ 18.36″ S)
Longitude: 144° 24.659′ E   (144.41098333° E / 144° 24′ 39.54″ E)

Datum: WGS84

Beverwyk 19

Beverwyk 19
Beverwyk 19
© Unknown

Steam Dredge | Max Depth: 46 metres (151 feet)

Scuttled on 7 May 1963.

Latitude: 38° 21.120′ S   (38.352° S / 38° 21′ 7.2″ S)
Longitude: 144° 25.171′ E   (144.41951667° E / 144° 25′ 10.26″ E)

Datum: WGS84

Birch Grove

Barque, Lighter

Built in 1856 and scuttled on 8 February 1932, the overall length of the vessel was approximately 41.67 metres (137 feet), beam 8.6 metres (28 feet) and draught 5.7 metres (19 feet) with a displacement weight of 470 tonne (518 short tons).

Location: Nobbies, Phillip Island

Brunette

Iron Barque, Coal Hulk | Max Depth: 70 metres (230 feet)

Built in 1859 and scuttled in July 1913, the overall length of the vessel was approximately 43 metres (141 feet), beam 7.7 metres (25 feet) and draught 4.8 metres (16 feet) with a displacement weight of 349 tonne (385 short tons).

Found in January 2006 by the Southern Ocean Exploration group.

Latitude: 38° 22.341′ S   (38.37235° S / 38° 22′ 20.46″ S)
Longitude: 144° 32.006′ E   (144.53342833° E / 144° 32′ 0.34″ E)

Datum: WGS84

Buninyong

Buninyong
Buninyong
© Unknown

Iron Hulled Steamship | Max Depth: 54 metres (177 feet)

Built in 1883 and scuttled on 11 February 1926, the overall length of the vessel was approximately 85.3 metres (280 feet), beam 11.6 metres (38 feet) and draught 6.2 metres (20 feet) with a displacement weight of 1,883 tonne (2,076 short tons).

Latitude: 38° 20.224′ S   (38.33707167° S / 38° 20′ 13.46″ S)
Longitude: 144° 31.041′ E   (144.51734167° E / 144° 31′ 2.43″ E)

Datum: WGS84

Bunyip

Bunyip
Bunyip
© Unknown

Steam Driven Iron Dredge | Max Depth: 58 metres (190 feet)

Built in 1879 and scuttled on 13 April 1955, the overall length of the vessel was approximately 48.9 metres (160 feet), beam 8.6 metres (28 feet) and draught 3 metres (9.8 feet) with a displacement weight of 287 tonne (316 short tons).

Latitude: 38° 22.305′ S   (38.37175833° S / 38° 22′ 18.33″ S)
Longitude: 144° 25.563′ E   (144.42605667° E / 144° 25′ 33.8″ E)

Datum: WGS84

Burke

Burke
Burke
© Unknown

Steam Driven Hopper Barge | Max Depth: 50 metres (164 feet)

Sister vessel to the Wills.

Built in 1876 or 1884 and scuttled on 23 September 1935, the overall length of the vessel was approximately 39 metres (128 feet), beam 9 metres (30 feet) and draught 2.9 metres (9.5 feet) with a displacement weight of 313 tonne (345 short tons).

Latitude: 38° 20.999′ S   (38.34998667° S / 38° 20′ 59.95″ S)
Longitude: 144° 25.982′ E   (144.43303667° E / 144° 25′ 58.93″ E)

Datum: WGS84

Campana

3 Masted Barque, Coal Hulk | Max Depth: 58 metres (190 feet)

Built in 1875 and scuttled on 30 July 1929, the overall length of the vessel was approximately 58.5 metres (192 feet), beam 9.7 metres (32 feet) and draught 5.9 metres (19 feet) with a displacement weight of 739 tonne (815 short tons).

Latitude: 38° 20.854′ S   (38.34756667° S / 38° 20′ 51.24″ S)
Longitude: 144° 34.150′ E   (144.56916667° E / 144° 34′ 9″ E)

Datum: WGS84

Casablanca

Casablanca
Casablanca
© Unknown

3 Masted Iron Barque, Lighter | Max Depth: 57 metres (187 feet)

Built in 1868 and scuttled on 16 February 1950, the overall length of the vessel was approximately 52.5 metres (172 feet), beam 8.5 metres (28 feet) and draught 5.3 metres (17 feet) with a displacement weight of 545 tonne (601 short tons).

Latitude: 38° 21.777′ S   (38.36295333° S / 38° 21′ 46.63″ S)
Longitude: 144° 26.332′ E   (144.43886667° E / 144° 26′ 19.92″ E)

Datum: WGS84

Coogee

Coogee
Coogee
© Unknown

Steel Hulled Steam Ship | Max Depth: 35 metres (115 feet)

A steamship used to transpost cargo and passengers the Coogee lies in 35 metres (115 feet) of water approximately 4 kilometres (2.5 miles) offshore between Point Lonsdale and Barwon Heads.

The vessel lies with its bow pointed towards shore (facing north) on a flat limestone and sand seabed. The now rests on the sand at 33 metres (108 feet) and the stern is at 35 metres (115 feet) depth. The bow and stern are the most complete structures of the wreck as most of the midships section is flattened or missing — most likely due to the use of explosives to scuttle the ship.

SS Coogee bow, Victoria, Australia
SS Coogee bow, Victoria
© Mary Malloy & Alan Beckhurst

At the bow, divers can see some of the original ship railings. At the stern, the rudder and rudder quadrant (used to steer the rudder) are still in position. In this area divers will also be able to see the remains of the two decks.

The Coogee's engine was removed prior to the steamship being scuttled on 27 February 1928 using explosive charges. However the engine bed and intact bowlers can be seen amidships. Hatches can be seen in the middle of the ship on the centre line.

Built in 1887 and scuttled on 27 February 1928, the overall length of the vessel was approximately 68.5 metres (225 feet), beam 9.2 metres (30 feet) and draught 4.1 metres (13 feet) with a displacement weight of 691 tonne (762 short tons).

Latitude: 38° 18.421′ S   (38.30702167° S / 38° 18′ 25.28″ S)
Longitude: 144° 34.306′ E   (144.57176667° E / 144° 34′ 18.36″ E)

Datum: WGS84

For more information see the SS Coogee page on the Heritage Victoria web site, or download/view the SS Coogee Dive Information Sheet (Adobe PDF | 276.15 KB).

Courier

Courier
Courier
© Unknown

Steel Hulled Steam Ship | Max Depth: 42 metres (138 feet)

The steel steamer Courier was launched in 1887 and spent her entire working life on Port Phillip Bay. In 1927 the Courier was sold to Melbourne ship-breakers and stripped of valuable fittings. On 29 March 1928 she was scuttled north-east of the Ships' Graveyard. She now lies in 42 metres (138 feet) of water, and is an accessible dive to deep-trained recreational divers.

Courier stern, Victoria, Australia
Courier stern, Victoria
© Mary Malloy & Alan Beckhurst

As with many of the wrecks in the Ships' Graveyard, the hull has mostly collapsed. The bow and stern sections are lying over to starboard and are the best preserved parts of the hull. The foredeck still retains a considerable amount of planking, a few deck fittings and some railing on the starboard side. This deck area is quite large and is an impressive sight, standing approximately seven metres off the bottom.

Immediately behind this, the hull has totally collapsed, leaving the main deck hatch coaming sitting on the bottom. Behind this are the two boilers sitting in line. On days with good visibility the dark shape of the stern can just be seen in the distance, although to see this close up requires a separate dive. The stem is also an impressive sight, but it is less structurally intact than the bow. The shape of the vessel's counter stern is still recognisable, and just forward of this, there is the remains of some superstructure.

Built in 1887 and scuttled on 29 March 1929, the overall length of the vessel was approximately 67.3 metres (221 feet), beam 9.1 metres (30 feet) and draught 3.8 metres (12 feet) with a displacement weight of 660 tonne (728 short tons).

Latitude: 38° 19.488′ S   (38.32479667° S / 38° 19′ 29.27″ S)
Longitude: 144° 34.920′ E   (144.58200833° E / 144° 34′ 55.23″ E)

Datum: WGS84

D McLennan

Steam Driven Dredge | Max Depth: 58 metres (190 feet)

Built in 1912 and scuttled on 8 June 1949, the overall length of the vessel was approximately 50.5 metres (166 feet), beam 8.9 metres (29 feet) and draught 2.4 metres (7.9 feet) with a displacement weight of 385 tonne (424 short tons).

Latitude: 38° 22.104′ S   (38.36839167° S / 38° 22′ 6.21″ S)
Longitude: 144° 25.983′ E   (144.433055° E / 144° 25′ 59″ E)

Datum: WGS84

Don Diego

Iron Barque, Coal Hulk | Max Depth: 72 metres (236 feet)

Built in 1855 and scuttled on 26 May 1916, the overall length of the vessel was approximately 44.4 metres (146 feet), beam 7.4 metres (24 feet) and draught 4.2 metres (14 feet) with a displacement weight of 290 tonne (320 short tons).

Latitude: 38° 23.726′ S   (38.39543333° S / 38° 23′ 43.56″ S)
Longitude: 144° 32.055′ E   (144.53425333° E / 144° 32′ 3.31″ E)

Datum: WGS84

Dunloe

3 Masted Iron Barque, Coal Hulk | Max Depth: 46 metres (151 feet)

Built in 1870 and scuttled on 2 July 1947, the overall length of the vessel was approximately 55 metres (180 feet), beam 9.3 metres (31 feet) and draught 5.6 metres (18 feet) with a displacement weight of 639 tonne (704 short tons).

Latitude: 38° 21.360′ S   (38.356° S / 38° 21′ 21.6″ S)
Longitude: 144° 24.205′ E   (144.40341667° E / 144° 24′ 12.3″ E)

Datum: WGS84

Edward Northcote

Edward Northcote
Edward Northcote
© Unknown

Steam Hopper Barge | Max Depth: 52 metres (171 feet)

Built in 1911 and scuttled on 6 November 1952, the overall length of the vessel was approximately 48.7 metres (160 feet), beam 8.6 metres (28 feet) and draught 3.8 metres (12 feet) with a displacement weight of 449 tonne (495 short tons).

Latitude: 38° 21.369′ S   (38.35615667° S / 38° 21′ 22.16″ S)
Longitude: 144° 25.799′ E   (144.42998333° E / 144° 25′ 47.94″ E)

Datum: WGS84

Euro

Euro
Euro
© Unknown

Steam Tug | Max Depth: 50 metres (164 feet)

Built in 1897 and scuttled on 10 June 1948, the overall length of the vessel was approximately 39.6 metres (130 feet), beam 6.9 metres (23 feet) and draught 3.7 metres (12 feet) with a displacement weight of 233 tonne (257 short tons).

Latitude: 38° 20.744′ S   (38.34573833° S / 38° 20′ 44.66″ S)
Longitude: 144° 26.094′ E   (144.434905° E / 144° 26′ 5.66″ E)

Datum: WGS84

Fawkner

Fawkner
Fawkner
© Unknown

Steam Driven Hopper Barge | Max Depth: 46 metres (151 feet)

Built in 1883 and scuttled on 20 May 1935, the overall length of the vessel was approximately 46.8 metres (154 feet), beam 8 metres (26 feet) and draught 3.7 metres (12 feet) with a displacement weight of 352 tonne (388 short tons).

Latitude: 38° 21.378′ S   (38.3563° S / 38° 21′ 22.68″ S)
Longitude: 144° 25.310′ E   (144.42183333° E / 144° 25′ 18.6″ E)

Datum: WGS84

Helen

3 Masted Barque, Coal Hulk

Built in 1864 and scuttled in March 1938, the overall length of the vessel was approximately 41.2 metres (135 feet), beam 7.7 metres (25 feet) and draught 4.2 metres (14 feet) with a displacement weight of 310 tonne (342 short tons).

H C Piggot

H C Piggot
H C Piggot
© Unknown

Steam Driven Hopper Barge | Max Depth: 48 metres (157 feet)

Built in 1912 and scuttled on 14 October 1935, the overall length of the vessel was approximately 48.8 metres (160 feet), beam 8.6 metres (28 feet) and draught 3.8 metres (12 feet) with a displacement weight of 449 tonne (495 short tons).

Latitude: 38° 20.651′ S   (38.34418333° S / 38° 20′ 39.06″ S)
Longitude: 144° 26.368′ E   (144.43946667° E / 144° 26′ 22.08″ E)

Datum: WGS84

Hume

Hume
Hume
© Unknown

Steam Tug

Built in 1922 and scuttled in the 1950's, the overall length of the vessel was approximately 18 metres (59 feet), beam 4.7 metres (15 feet) and draught 2 metres (6.6 feet) with a displacement weight of 43 tonne (47 short tons).


Hygeia

Hygeia
Hygeia
© Unknown

Paddle Steamer | Max Depth: 62 metres (203 feet)

Built in 1890 and scuttled on 10 June 1932, the overall length of the vessel was approximately 91.5 metres (300 feet), beam 9.8 metres (32 feet) and draught 3.4 metres (11 feet) with a displacement weight of 894 tonne (985 short tons).

Latitude: 38° 21.017′ S   (38.350275° S / 38° 21′ 0.99″ S)
Longitude: 144° 33.633′ E   (144.56054833° E / 144° 33′ 37.97″ E)

Datum: WGS84

J1 Submarine

J1 Submarine
J1 Submarine
© Unknown

Diesel Electric Submarine | Max Depth: 38 metres (125 feet)

HMS J1 later HMAS J1 was a Royal Navy J class submarine built by HM Dockyard at Portsmouth in Hampshire and launched on 6 November 1915. The wartime complement was 5 officers and 40 men.

The six British built J class submarines were transferred to the Royal Australian Navy on 25 March 1919. They had served for a short time with the Royal Navy's 11th Submarine Flotilla, and although they proved to be the fastest submarines of their time, they were unreliable. So they ended up in Australia! The six submarines departed Portsmouth on 9 April 1919, arriving in Sydney on 10 July 1919 where they underwent a very necessary refit. By May 1922 all six submarines had been decommissioned.

J1 Submarine bow, Victoria, Australia
J1 Submarine bow, Victoria
© Mary Malloy & Alan Beckhurst

The J1 submarine was the only submarine to have crippled capital ships with a single salvo. She was also fitted with depth charges and was the only submarine to ever sink another sub with depth charges.

J1 was sold to the Melbourne Salvage Company on 26th February 1924. After stripping anything that proved valuable, she was scuttled off Barwon Heads on 26th May 1926.

She was rediscovered in 1985 and now lies almost upright with a slight list to port in 38 metres (125 feet) with the conning tower rising to 34 metres (112 feet).


J1 Submarine Wreck from Alan Beckhurst on Vimeo.

The J1 Submarine is also known as the J1 Sub, 38 Metre Sub, 125 Foot Sub, or New Deep Sub. The hull lies northeast to southwest (bow northeast) and is covered in bright yellow zoanthids.

Built in 1915 and scuttled on 26 May 1926, the overall length of the vessel was approximately 83.7 metres (275 feet), beam 7.2 metres (24 feet) and draught 4.3 metres (14 feet) giving a displacement weight of 1,092 tonne (1,204 short tons) surfaced.

Latitude: 38° 18.959′ S   (38.31598833° S / 38° 18′ 57.56″ S)
Longitude: 144° 33.219′ E   (144.55364833° E / 144° 33′ 13.13″ E)

Datum: WGS84

J2 Submarine

Diesel Electric Submarine | Max Depth: 39 metres (128 feet)

Completed Nov 1915 at Portsmouth Dock Yard. At the completion of the first World War in 1919, the British Government gave Australia a gift of six J class submarines and six navy destroyers. All of the submarines were eventually scuttled.

The J2 Submarine was scuttled by explosives on 1 June 1926 about three miles off Barwon Heads.

Known as the J2 Sub, 39 Metre Sub, 130 Foot Sub, Broken Sub or Deep Sub, the wreck lies on its keel running North-South with its bow pointing out to sea. During its scuttling the bow section broke off, exposing the forward torpedoes tubes and bow modifications.

The J2 Submarine is probably the most infrequently dived of the four J class submarines. It is the deepest, and it is also the closest to the Heads. It can therefore be uncomfortably close to the path taken by ships entering and leaving Port Phillip Bay. Boat operators must be aware of the shipping traffic during the dive period.

During the Broken Sub's scuttling, explosive charges caused the vessel to break in two sections. The break occurs about 5 metres behind the conning tower. The front half lists to starboard at a 45-degree angle. Over the years the stern has worn down through the reef the wreck sits on.

The wreck is in 39 metres (128 feet) and is surrounded by many schools of fish. These along with the extensive marine growth covering the hull make this an interesting dive for photographers as well as wreck enthusiasts.

Being such a deep dive, it is recommend that divers spend the last few minutes of their limited bottom time at a slightly shallower depth around the conning tower before beginning the final ascent. This area is usually inhabited by large numbers of fish, so there is plenty to look at before returning to the surface.

The Broken Sub is a marvelous venue for the experienced diver. Obviously more than one dive is required to fully explore it. With good visibility it is an outstanding dive.

Hazards and Precautions:

The 39 metres (128 feet) depth calls for experience and training, correct equipment and very careful planning. Begin your ascent with plenty of air remaining for the inevitable decompression stops. Even at this depth surge can be a problem, especially when penetrating inside the wreck.

If surge is present remain on the outside. If you just swim over the wreck from stern to bow most of the dive will be spent in 33 metres (108 feet).

J2 Submarine plaque, Victoria, Australia
J2 Submarine plaque, Victoria
© Mary Malloy & Alan Beckhurst

Penetration into the wreck is possible, at the point where the ship has been broken, but the need for extreme caution cannot be overemphasised. At 36 metres (118 feet) near the conning tower is a plaque in memory of a diver that died while penetrating the wreck.

In addition to the normal dangers involved in penetration diving at this depth, the Broken Submarine has the additional hazard of extensive jagged and twisted metal around the break.

Once inside the wreck, it can become very dark, so good torches are essential. Silting can occur very easily. Care must be taken to avoid stirring up silt on the bottom, thus further reducing visibility.

Built in 1915 and scuttled on 1 June 1926, the overall length of the vessel was approximately 83.7 metres (275 feet), beam 7.2 metres (24 feet) and draught 4.3 metres (14 feet) giving a displacement weight of 1,092 tonne (1,204 short tons) surfaced.

Latitude: 38° 18.814′ S   (38.31357° S / 38° 18′ 48.85″ S)
Longitude: 144° 34.803′ E   (144.58004833° E / 144° 34′ 48.17″ E)

Datum: WGS84

J4 Submarine

J4 Submarine
J4 Submarine
© Unknown

Diesel Electric Submarine | Max Depth: 27 metres (89 feet)

At the completion of the first World War in 1919, the British Government gave Australia a gift of six J class submarines and six navy destroyers. All of the submarines were eventually scuttled.

The J4 was scuttled by explosives on 28 April 1927.

Known as the 26 metre, 27 metre and 90 foot sub, the J4 Sub wreck lies on its keel running North-South with its bow pointing out to sea. During its scuttling the bow section broke off, exposing the forward torpedoes tubes and bow modifications.

J4 Submarine conning tower, Victoria, Australia
J4 Submarine conning tower
© Mary Malloy & Alan Beckhurst

The conning tower is intact and in excellent condition.

Divers can penetrate the submarine through the numerous hatch openings. Such penetration should not be taken lightly, as being shallower than the other subs, this wreck is particularly susceptible to surge. Unwary divers can be literally sucked in and catapulted through the wreck's interior. However, the surge prevents any silting, and under suitable conditions this makes for one of Melbourne's top dives.

Once inside, divers can see the bulkheads, which supported the submarine against pressure at great depths. Although the engine has been removed, the engine bed can still be seen at the stern.

The broken bow section of the submarine contains four torpedo tubes, which can be easily seen by using a torch and positioning yourself between the bow and the main body.

A bronze plaque has been placed at the site by the Bottom Scratches Dive Club who rediscovered the submarine in 1982.

As with the other Subs, the J4 sub is host to a variety of plant and animal life. Good conditions for photography are often found near the conning tower, which is usually surrounded by many fish.

Built in 1915/1916 and scuttled on 28 April 1927, the overall length of the vessel was approximately 83.7 metres (275 feet), beam 7.2 metres (24 feet) and draught 4.3 metres (14 feet) giving a displacement weight of 1,092 tonne (1,204 short tons) surfaced.

Latitude: 38° 17.979′ S   (38.29965667° S / 38° 17′ 58.76″ S)
Longitude: 144° 33.820′ E   (144.56367333° E / 144° 33′ 49.22″ E)

Datum: WGS84

For more information see the J4 Submarine page on the Heritage Victoria web site, or download/view the J4 Submarine Dive Information Sheet (Adobe PDF | 564.76 KB).

J5 Submarine

J5 Submarine
J5 Submarine
© Unknown

Diesel Electric Submarine | Max Depth: 36 metres (118 feet)

Built in 1915/1916 and scuttled on 1 June 1926, the overall length of the vessel was approximately 83.7 metres (275 feet), beam 7.2 metres (24 feet) and draught 4.7 metres (15 feet) giving a displacement weight of 1,092 tonne (1,204 short tons) surfaced.

Latitude: 38° 18.649′ S   (38.31082167° S / 38° 18′ 38.96″ S)
Longitude: 144° 34.118′ E   (144.56863167° E / 144° 34′ 7.07″ E)

Datum: WGS84

John Nimmo

John Nimmo
John Nimmo
© Unknown

Steam Dredge | Max Depth: 68 metres (223 feet)

Built in 1887 and scuttled on 10 August 1931, the overall length of the vessel was approximately 69.6 metres (228 feet), beam 14.2 metres (47 feet) and draught 4.7 metres (15 feet) giving a displacement weight of 1,097 tonne (1,209 short tons).

Latitude: 38° 21.787′ S   (38.36312333° S / 38° 21′ 47.24″ S)
Longitude: 144° 33.355′ E   (144.55592167° E / 144° 33′ 21.32″ E)

Datum: WGS84


Port Phillip Heads Shipwrecks

Victoria's Port Phillip Heads have been extremeley hazardous for ships, from the first recorded wreck in 1840 unitl the present. The treacherous currents, hidden reefs and narow channels of Port Phillip Heads have contributed to the demise of over 200 vessels of all types, ranging from small coastal schooners to large iron steamers. The wrecks of Point Lonsdale, Point Nepean and the Back Beaches, are frequented regularly by Melbourne divers by boat and from the shore.

Shipwrecks Around Port Phillip Heads
Shipwrecks Around Port Phillip Heads
© Stan Bugg & Bob Wealthy

The best reference book on diving the Port Phillip Heads wrecks is:
"Shipwrecks Around Port Phillip Heads"
Authors: Stan Bugg and Bob Wealthy
Published: 1995 by Oceans Enterprises
ISBN: 9780958665773

This book is a comprehensive scuba diver's guide to locating the wreck sites, and a description of what remains will be found.

For the non-diver, the accounts of each ship's history, and the circumstances of her sinking, are a fascinating insight into our turbulent maritime history.


If you have photographs or information you'd be happy to see added to the information available here, please feel free to contact us.

Copyright in photographs and other materials used here remains with their artists and authors. We are happy to acknowledge appropriate copyrights should they be made known to us.

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