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Melbourne Drift Dives

Melbourne Drift Dives by The Scuba Doctor

Drift diving can provide you with some of the most exhilarating dives of your life. Especially in Melbourne where at the right time of the year, the currents can be very strong.

Some Melbourne drift dives are about the thrill of being swept effortlessly along in fast current. Others are about cruising along slowly taking in the spectacular underwater terrain. And in Melbourne, some are about covering an area of the sandy sea bed floor of Port Phillip while gathering a feed of scallops.

Drift diving in Port Philip is a little different to drift diving in other areas of the world because of our strong currents and the amount of boating traffic. Divers are typically split into separate groups depending on numbers and are given a long length of rope, around 50 metres, with a buoy and dive flag attached to one end. The idea is to descend as a group spaced along the line keeping parallel to the current. It sound tricky but it isn't. This is really the easiest form of diving as very little kicking is required or navigation. You just go with the flow! Your air supply lasts longer and the terrain is always changing.

Before you undertake a drift dive in Melbourne, please read our guide to Diving in Melbourne Currents.

Safety Tip: We recommend you read our Boat Diving Safety and Using a Dive Float and Flag pages and use the described Cray/Drift Buoy Line Diver Freedom System when drift diving from a private boat.

Melbourne Drift Dive Site Locations

You can see where the popular Melbourne and Victorian drift dive locations are via our Melbourne Dive Sites Map. The GPS marks for these drift dives are also listed here, plus on our Melbourne Dive Site GPS Marks page.

Here are some Melbourne drift dive sites where you might get to fly underwater.

Artifacts Flood

Drift Dive Boat access
Drift Dive Site Inside Port Phillip Bay Open Water Rated

The Artifacts Flood dive is where you get to drift dive over an area where a wide range of artifacts can be seen. It's a treasure hunt as the artifacts get covered and uncovered by the sand so what you may see is constantly changing. Most of the artifacts were probably discarded overboard by ships moored off of the Quarantine Station when it was in use.

Latitude: 38° 17.995′ S   (38.299917° S / 38° 17′ 59.7″ S)
Longitude: 144° 41.287′ E   (144.688117° E / 144° 41′ 17.22″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2019-02-24 00:04:19 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Quarantine Station Reef, 563 m, bearing 221°, SW
See the Artifacts Flood dive site page

Boarfish Reef Drift

Drift Dive Boat access
Crayfish Dive Site Drift Dive Site Inside Port Phillip Bay Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site

Depth: 6 metres (20 feet) to 20 metres (66 feet)

A drift dive over the famous Boarfish Reef area.

Divers have the opportunity to catch crayfish (Southern Rock Lobster) at this dive site. Remember your catch bag, current Victorian Recreational Fishing Licence, rock lobster measure, and cray tags. Please abide by all current fishing regulations if you intend to catch crays. See How To Catch Crayfish for practical cray hunting advice from The Scuba Doctor.

Latitude: 38° 14.420′ S   (38.240337° S / 38° 14′ 25.21″ S)
Longitude: 144° 42.583′ E   (144.709717° E / 144° 42′ 34.98″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2019-02-15 08:24:58 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Mountain Maid, 287 m, bearing 335°, NNW
Depth: 6 to 20 m.
Dive only on: SWF, SWE.
See the Boarfish Reef Drift dive site page

Catch Bag Reef Drift

Drift Dive Boat access
Crayfish Dive Site Drift Dive Site Inside Port Phillip Bay Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site Abalone Dive Site

Depth: 12 metres (39 feet) to 24 metres (79 feet)

Great Crayfish Dive Site

The name Catch Bag Reef Drift originates back in the mists of time. The story goes that one day a cray diver of great notoriety had the largest cray he had ever seen in his catch bag. Unfortunately as he handed his gear to the boat the catch bag was lost along with the cray.

This drift is conducted on the flood tide over a kelp forest in the Lonsdale Bight between Point Lonsdale and Queenscliff in Port Phillip. This site also makes a great slack water dive.

During the drift you will encounter large fronds of kelp with broken sandstone reef, home to the Southern Rock Lobster (Crayfish) and Abalone. During the summer months, big schools of large Yellow Tail Kingfish can be seen.

Divers have the opportunity to catch crayfish (Southern Rock Lobster) at this dive site. Remember your catch bag, current Victorian Recreational Fishing Licence, rock lobster measure, and cray tags. Please abide by all current fishing regulations if you intend to catch crays. See How To Catch Crayfish for practical cray hunting advice from The Scuba Doctor.

Divers have the opportunity to catch abalone at this dive site. Remember your catch bag, legal abalone tool, current Victorian Recreational Fishing Licence, and abalone measure. Please abide by all current fishing regulations if you intend to catch abalone. See How to Catch Abalone for practical abalone hunting advice from The Scuba Doctor.

Latitude: 38° 17.144′ S   (38.285733° S / 38° 17′ 8.64″ S)
Longitude: 144° 37.981′ E   (144.633017° E / 144° 37′ 58.86″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2019-03-16 00:39:52 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Lonsdale Wall Shallow, 207 m, bearing 265°, W
Depth: 12 to 24 m.
See the Catch Bag Reef Drift dive site page

Cattle Jetty Drift

Drift Dive Boat access
Drift Dive Site Inside Port Phillip Bay Open Water Rated

Depth: 8 metres (26 feet) to 18 metres (59 feet)

Cattle Jetty Drift is an interesting drift dive near the remains of the Cattle Jetty used to land livestock destined for the Quarantine Station facilities at Point Nepean, inside Port Phillip. This facility was dedicated to confining new stock arrivals until they had been declared free of disease.

Latitude: 38° 18.095′ S   (38.301583° S / 38° 18′ 5.7″ S)
Longitude: 144° 40.825′ E   (144.680417° E / 144° 40′ 49.5″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2019-02-16 23:28:58 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Quarantine Station Reef, 380 m, bearing 128°, SE
Depth: 8 to 18 m.
See the Cattle Jetty Drift dive site page

Geoffs Scallop Hole

Drift Dive Boat access
Drift Dive Site Inside Port Phillip Bay Open Water Rated Scallops Dive Site

Depth: 10 metres (33 feet) to 17 metres (56 feet)

The goal on a drift dive at Geoff's Scallop Hole is to enable enough ground to be covered to ensure you can fill your catch bag with great big fat juicy scallops. The scallop beds move around a little, and there is no guarantee you will see them straight away. But rest assured you will see them.

In Summer the scallops can generally be found in the areas nearby with depths ranging from 14 metres to 17 metres. The scallops like the cooler deeper water in summer.

In Winter the scallops are typically found in the areas nearby with depths ranging for 10 metres to 15 metres. The move into shallower waters for added warmth in winter.

Typically you would head out to this dive site from the Rye Boat Ramp and head west. The dive site is midway between Blairgowrie Pier and Rye Pier, just out from the Tyrone Boat Ramp in the Whitecliffs area. The bottom is flat sand with Scallops, Stingrays, Sea Squirts, Flat Head, and Large Spider Crabs. (The crabs are not suitable for eating.)

The Scuba Doctor staff member Geoff Rodda has been gathering scallops here for many, many years. It was where he took divers when running his own dive charter boat, and then later when driving the Dive Victoria dive charter boats. It's where he heads out in his own boat for a feed of scallops. But don't blame Geoff if you don't find the scallops. They do move about.

Divers have the opportunity to catch a feed of scallops (Pecten fumatus) at this dive site. Remember your catch bag and current Victorian Recreational Fishing Licence. Please abide by all current fishing regulations, such as the bag limit of 100 scallops each, if you intend to catch scallops.

Safety Tip: We recommend you read our Boat Diving Safety and Using a Dive Float and Flag pages and use the described Cray/Drift Buoy Line Diver Freedom System when drift diving from a private boat for scallops.

Latitude: 38° 21.549′ S   (38.35915° S / 38° 21′ 32.94″ S)
Longitude: 144° 47.781′ E   (144.79635° E / 144° 47′ 46.86″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2019-02-17 05:35:16 GMT, Last updated: 2019-02-17 21:22:39 GMT
Source: Geoff Rodda GPS
Nearest Neighbour: JLs Scallop Beds, 673 m, bearing 86°, E
Depth: 10 to 17 m.
See the Geoffs Scallop Hole dive site page

JLs Scallop Beds

Drift Dive Boat access
Drift Dive Site Inside Port Phillip Bay Open Water Rated Scallops Dive Site

Depth: 10 metres (33 feet) to 17 metres (56 feet)

The goal on a drift dive at JL's Scallop Beds is to enable enough ground to be covered to ensure you can fill your catch bag with great big fat juicy scallops. The scallop beds move around a little, and there is no guarantee you will see scallops straight away. But rest assured you will see them.

In Summer the scallops can generally be found in the areas nearby with depths ranging from 14 metres to 17 metres. The scallops like the cooler deeper water in summer.

In Winter the scallops are typically found in the areas nearby with depths ranging for 10 metres to 15 metres. The move into shallower waters for added warmth in winter.

Typically you would head out to this dive site from the Rye Boat Ramp and head west. The dive site is midway between Blairgowrie Pier and Rye Pier, just out from the Tyrone Boat Ramp in the Whitecliffs area. The bottom is flat sand with Scallops, Stingrays, Sea Squirts, Flat Head, and Large Spider Crabs. (The crabs are not suitable for eating.)

JL's Scallop Beds is named after local diving legend John Lawler, a life member of the Victorian Sub-Aqua Group (VSAG) independent dive club, and co-founder and past president of the Victorian Artificial Reef Society (VARS). But don't blame JL if you don't find the scallops. They do move about.

Divers have the opportunity to catch a feed of scallops (Pecten fumatus) at this dive site. Remember your catch bag and current Victorian Recreational Fishing Licence. Please abide by all current fishing regulations, such as the bag limit of 100 scallops each, if you intend to catch scallops.

Safety Tip: We recommend you read our Boat Diving Safety and Using a Dive Float and Flag pages and use the described Cray/Drift Buoy Line Diver Freedom System when drift diving from a private boat for scallops.

Latitude: 38° 21.525′ S   (38.35875° S / 38° 21′ 31.5″ S)
Longitude: 144° 48.243′ E   (144.80405° E / 144° 48′ 14.58″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2019-02-17 14:09:35 GMT, Last updated: 2019-02-17 21:39:36 GMT
Source: John Lawler GPS (verified)
Nearest Neighbour: Geoffs Scallop Hole, 673 m, bearing 266°, W
Depth: 10 to 17 m.
See the JLs Scallop Beds dive site page

JLs Scallop Drift

Drift Dive Boat access
Drift Dive Site Inside Port Phillip Bay Open Water Rated Scallops Dive Site

Depth: 15 metres (49 feet)

The goal on JL's Scallop Drift dive is to enable enough ground to be covered to ensure you can fill your catch bag with great big fat juicy scallops. The scallop beds move around a little, and there is no guarantee you will see them straight away. But rest assured you will see them.

JL's Scallop Drift is named after local diving legend John Lawler, a life member of the Victorian Sub-Aqua Group (VSAG) independent dive club, and co-founder and past president of the Victorian Artificial Reef Society (VARS). The dive site itself is in Capel Sound, Port Phillip, off the bay beach of Rye. The bottom is flat sand with Scallops, Stingrays, Sea Squirts, Flat Head, and Large Spider Crabs. (The crabs are not suitable for eating.)

Divers have the opportunity to catch a feed of scallops (Pecten fumatus) at this dive site. Remember your catch bag and current Victorian Recreational Fishing Licence. Please abide by all current fishing regulations, such as the bag limit of 100 scallops each, if you intend to catch scallops.

Safety Tip: We recommend you read our Boat Diving Safety and Using a Dive Float and Flag pages and use the described Cray/Drift Buoy Line Diver Freedom System when drift diving from a private boat for scallops.

Latitude: 38° 20.238′ S   (38.3373° S / 38° 20′ 14.28″ S)
Longitude: 144° 51.091′ E   (144.851517° E / 144° 51′ 5.46″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2019-02-17 13:53:57 GMT, Last updated: 2019-02-17 21:40:30 GMT
Source: John Lawler GPS (verified)
Nearest Neighbour: Rye Scallop Drift, 450 m, bearing 343°, NNW
Depth: 15 m.
See the JLs Scallop Drift dive site page

Kelp Beds Reef Drift

Drift Dive Boat access
Crayfish Dive Site Drift Dive Site Inside Port Phillip Bay Open Water Rated Outside Port Phillip Bay Reef Dive Site Abalone Dive Site

Depth: 10 metres (33 feet) to 21 metres (69 feet)

Kelp Beds Reef Drift is conducted on the flood tide over a macro cysts kelp forest in Lonsdale Bight between Point Lonsdale and Queenscliff. This dive site also makes a great slack water dive, with depths ranging from 10 to 21 metres. During the drift dive you will encounter large fronds of kelp with broken sandstone reef, often home to the Southern Rock Lobster (Crayfish) and Abalone. During the summer months, big schools of large Yellow Tail Kingfish can be seen, or large schools of Old Wives.

Divers have the opportunity to catch crayfish (Southern Rock Lobster) at this dive site. Remember your catch bag, current Victorian Recreational Fishing Licence, rock lobster measure, and cray tags. Please abide by all current fishing regulations if you intend to catch crays. See How To Catch Crayfish for practical cray hunting advice from The Scuba Doctor.

Divers have the opportunity to catch abalone at this dive site. Remember your catch bag, legal abalone tool, current Victorian Recreational Fishing Licence, and abalone measure. Please abide by all current fishing regulations if you intend to catch abalone. See How to Catch Abalone for practical abalone hunting advice from The Scuba Doctor.

Latitude: 38° 17.008′ S   (38.283469° S / 38° 17′ 0.49″ S)
Longitude: 144° 39.584′ E   (144.659729° E / 144° 39′ 35.02″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2019-02-15 08:31:29 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Hot Spot, 275 m, bearing 39°, NE
Depth: 10 to 21 m.
Dive only on: Flood.
See the Kelp Beds Reef Drift dive site page

Quarantine Station Reef

Drift Dive Boat access
Drift Dive Site Inside Port Phillip Bay Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site

Depth: 12 metres (39 feet) to 22 metres (72 feet)

Named after the Point Nepean Quarantine Station, this is a fantastic drift dive site. It's located about 200 to 300 metres out in front of the old Quarantine Station on Point Nepean inside Port Phillip. The quarantine station operated for over 100 years from the early 1850s to about 1950. During that time hundreds of ships anchored here for extended periods of time, to ensure that no communicable diseases were brought into the colony of Melbourne.

The reef here has its top in about 12 metres of water and runs East to West parallel to the current. The reef drops away to the South with depths of 20 metres able to be reached. The reef is very nice with lots of soft corals and sponges.

It's the possibility of spotting artefacts discarded from the sailing vessels over 100 years ago, that make this dive exciting. The site has 6 large anchors and is littered with old bottles, china plates, bowels, cups, clay jugs and the occasional 9 inch black powder gun shell. Some very good finds have been made in this area including intact plates from the White Star Line, P&O, Black Ball Packets, Pacific Steam Navigation Company, A.U.S.N.C and a full carving plate from the Albert Star. One day it's just an underwater sand dune, the next day a treasure display.

This site can be shore or boat dived and can be dived on any tide or slack water. The best time is when the water is moving and drift diving is the most common way to find things and cover a large area without swimming too hard.

While there is a light reef area, it's mostly a sandy bottom. There is not a lot of life on the bottom. At times there can be a lot of Spider Crabs, and Stingray hide in the sand. The odd pod of Dolphins and the occasional Seal can be seen in this area.

Latitude: 38° 18.222′ S   (38.3037° S / 38° 18′ 13.32″ S)
Longitude: 144° 41.030′ E   (144.683833° E / 144° 41′ 1.8″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2019-02-15 08:37:29 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Cattle Jetty Drift, 380 m, bearing 308°, NW
Depth: 12 to 22 m.
Dive only on: SWF, SWE.
See the Quarantine Station Reef dive site page

Rye Scallop Beds

Drift Dive Boat access
Drift Dive Site Inside Port Phillip Bay Open Water Rated Scallops Dive Site

Depth: 10 metres (33 feet) to 17 metres (56 feet)

The goal on a drift dive at the Rye Scallop Beds is to enable enough ground to be covered to ensure you can fill your catch bag with great big fat juicy scallops. The scallop beds move around a little, and there is no guarantee you will see scallops straight away. But rest assured you will see them.

In Summer the scallops can generally be found in the areas nearby with depths ranging from 14 metres to 17 metres. The scallops like the cooler deeper water in summer.

In Winter the scallops are typically found in the areas nearby with depths ranging for 10 metres to 15 metres. The move into shallower waters for added warmth in winter.

Typically you would head out to this dive site from the Rye Boat Ramp and head west. The dive site is midway between Blairgowrie Pier and Rye Pier, just out from the Tyrone Boat Ramp in the Whitecliffs area. The bottom is flat sand with Scallops, Stingrays, Sea Squirts, Flat Head, and Large Spider Crabs. (The crabs are not suitable for eating.)

Divers have the opportunity to catch a feed of scallops (Pecten fumatus) at this dive site. Remember your catch bag and current Victorian Recreational Fishing Licence. Please abide by all current fishing regulations, such as the bag limit of 100 scallops each, if you intend to catch scallops.

Safety Tip: We recommend you read our Boat Diving Safety and Using a Dive Float and Flag pages and use the described Cray/Drift Buoy Line Diver Freedom System when drift diving from a private boat for scallops.

Latitude: 38° 20.812′ S   (38.346867° S / 38° 20′ 48.72″ S)
Longitude: 144° 47.684′ E   (144.794733° E / 144° 47′ 41.04″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2019-02-17 14:16:00 GMT, Last updated: 2019-02-17 21:24:01 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Geoffs Scallop Hole, 1,373 m, bearing 174°, S
Depth: 10 to 17 m.
See the Rye Scallop Beds dive site page

Rye Scallop Drift

Drift Dive Boat access
Drift Dive Site Inside Port Phillip Bay Open Water Rated Scallops Dive Site

Depth: 15 metres (49 feet)

The goal on this Rye Scallop Drift dive is to enable enough ground to be covered to ensure you can fill your catch bag with great big fat juicy scallops. The scallop beds move around a little, and there is no guarantee you will see them straight away. But rest assured you will see them.

The Rye Scallop Drift dive site itself is in Capel Sound, Port Phillip, off the bay beach of Rye. It's not too far away from a large marker pylon with '13' on it and a structure of pylons with seals. The bottom is flat sand with Scallops, Stingrays, Sea Squirts, Flat Head, and Large Spider Crabs. (The crabs are not suitable for eating.)

Divers have the opportunity to catch a feed of scallops (Pecten fumatus) at this dive site. Remember your catch bag and current Victorian Recreational Fishing Licence. Please abide by all current fishing regulations, such as the bag limit of 100 scallops each, if you intend to catch scallops.

Safety Tip: We recommend you read our Boat Diving Safety and Using a Dive Float and Flag pages and use the described Cray/Drift Buoy Line Diver Freedom System when drift diving from a private boat for scallops.

Latitude: 38° 20.005′ S   (38.333417° S / 38° 20′ 0.3″ S)
Longitude: 144° 51.003′ E   (144.85005° E / 144° 51′ 0.18″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2019-02-17 14:40:45 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: JLs Scallop Drift, 450 m, bearing 163°, SSE
Depth: 15 m.
See the Rye Scallop Drift dive site page

San Remo Bridge

Drift Dive Shore access
Advanced Open Water Rated Drift Dive Site Slack Water Inside Western Port Bay

Depth: 3 metres (9.8 feet) to 13 metres (43 feet)

Level: Advanced Open Water and beyond

San Remo Bridge
San Remo Bridge
© Unknown

San Remo Bridge is the gateway to Phillip Island. The bridge spans the gap between the mainland at San Remo, and Newhaven on Phillip Island, which is known as The Narrows.

Warning: Do not even think about diving this site unless you are an extremely fit diver who is highly competent diving in very fast currents.

Currents are a huge factor when trying to do a drift dive at San Remo Bridge. Extremely strong tidal currents swirl through The Narrows sometimes as fast as 6 knots. Thus this drift dive requires a huge degree of skill, careful observation, and cautious timing. It should not be attempted unless you have done many dives under San Remo Jetty and are thus aware of how fast the local currents run, how quickly they change, and where best to enter and exit the water.

The purpose of this drift dive is to leave the shore at the San Remo Jetty near the end of a flood tide, head out to the rocky reef mid-channel under the bridge, and then quickly head back to the San Remo Pier and beach as soon as you get an indication of the ebb tide current change. Thus you might get 10 minutes to explore the reef mid-channel during slack water.

The reef is covered in corals and supports lots of marine life. Everything gets a rich feast from the nutrients delivered on the srtrong currents in The Narrows.

Newhaven Chart
Newhaven Chart
© Parks Victoria

To successfully drift dive the San Remo Bridge you need to take your time and carefully observe the current flow. Be ready to enter the water from the beach just as the flood current is about to end. Head out to the bridge pylons mid channel. If you get the timing of your return right, you should be able to safely return to the San Remo Jetty and beach. If not, you'll be in big trouble, drifting at up to 6 knots past Cape Woolamai and on your way to Tasmania.

See WillyWeather as a guide for the tide times and the height of the tide.

Do not underestimate the fitness, skills and experience required to do this drift dive.

Latitude: 38° 31.116′ S   (38.518605° S / 38° 31′ 6.98″ S)
Longitude: 145° 21.866′ E   (145.364429° E / 145° 21′ 51.94″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2019-05-05 02:36:27 GMT, Last updated: 2019-05-05 05:26:25 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: San Remo Jetty, 220 m, bearing 172°, S
Depth: 3 to 13 m.
See the San Remo Bridge dive site page

Sponge Garden Drift

Drift Dive Boat access
Drift Dive Site Inside Port Phillip Bay Open Water Rated Reef Dive Site

Depth: 12 metres (39 feet) to 20 metres (66 feet)


Sponge Hollows, by Jane Headley.

Sponge Garden Drift takes you over massive sponge gardens and shallow reefs inside Port Phillip. It's the colours of the sponges that make this dive stunning. As in any drift dive the terrain is always changing and you originally start drifting over an area of shallow reefs then over the sponge gardens and finally over larger reefs and Bommies.

The fish life on these dives varies just as much as the terrain and of course there is always the chance of coming across old bottles and other collectable artefacts.

Latitude: 38° 16.501′ S   (38.275017° S / 38° 16′ 30.06″ S)
Longitude: 144° 39.971′ E   (144.666183° E / 144° 39′ 58.26″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2019-02-15 08:34:26 GMT
Source: Peter Fear GPS (verified)
Nearest Neighbour: Torpedo Reef, 286 m, bearing 215°, SW
Depth: 12 to 20 m.
Dive only on: Ebb.
See the Sponge Garden Drift dive site page

Total of 13 dive sites.


DISCLAIMER: No claim is made by The Scuba Doctor as to the accuracy of the dive site coordinates listed here. Should anyone decide to use these GPS marks to locate and dive on a site, they do so entirely at their own risk. Always verify against other sources.

The marks come from numerous sources including commercial operators, independent dive clubs, reference works, and active divers. Some are known to be accurate, while others may not be. Some GPS marks may even have come from maps using the AGD66 datum, and thus may need be converted to the WGS84 datum. To distinguish between the possible accuracy of the dive site marks, we've tried to give each mark a source of GPS, Google Earth, or unknown.

If you don't understand the differences between the different ways coordinates are given, plus how different datum come into play, you might find the article GPS Conversions by Lloyd Borrett a useful read. It describes the problems associated with locating dive sites using a GPS receiver.

GPS latitude explained


Scuba Doctor Dive Map KML File

In the true spirit of making it easy to obtain, utilise and share the information for non-commercial purposes, you can now Download/view the Scuba Doctor Dive Map GPS Marks (KML file | 243.99 KB | 08-May-2019) in the Keyhole Markup Language (KML) file format used to display geographic data in an Earth browser such as Google Earth and Google Maps.

Some marine GPS units can import the information from a KML file. For others you can use use a file translate program (e.g. GPSBabel) to convert the KML file into an import file format (e.g. GPX) supported by your GPS unit.


Please Help Us To Correct GPS Marks and Add More Melbourne Dive Sites

If you have have information about other dive sites you'd be happy to see added to the information available here, or any corrections and/or updates to the diving site GPS marks listed here, please feel free to Contact Us. See also, Dive Site Help.

The Scuba Doctor Air, Nitrox and Trimix Fills

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