Victoria Wreck Dives

Of course, there are plenty of wreck dives in the waters of Victoria that aren't so close to Melbourne. Here is some information about them

Shipwrecks at Wilsons Promontory

Cambridge

Wreck Dive Boat access
Cambridge
Cambridge
© Unknown

The wreck of the SS Cambridge is historically significant as the first Allied vessel to be lost in Australian waters in World War II. Along with the wrecks of the MS City of Rayville (1940), HMAS Goorangai (1940) and SS Iron Crown (1942) the Cambridge represents the arrival of World War II in Australian waters, the strategic importance of the Bass Strait shipping lane, and the extent of Axis activities in the Southern hemisphere.

While on a voyage from Cardiff (United Kingdom) to Brisbane via Sydney, the SS Cambridge struck a German mine and sunk in Bass Strait, 3.7nm SE of Wilsons Promontory, on 7 November 1940.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: SS Cambridge, and Australian National Shipwreck Database: S.S.Cambridge.

Latitude: 39° 9.810′ S   (39.1635° S / 39° 9′ 48.6″ S)
Longitude: 146° 29.780′ E   (146.496333° E / 146° 29′ 46.8″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-14 22:55:01 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Gulf of Carpentaria, 17,544 m, bearing 276°, W
Steel hulled screw steamer.
Depth: 60 to 68 m.
Dive only on: SWF, SWE.

Gulf of Carpentaria

Wreck Dive Boat access

On the 15th of September 1885, the SS Gulf of Carpentaria , bound for England, struck an uncharted rock off Wilson's Promontory, Victoria, Australia, and sank. Now,130 years later, she lies mostly collapsed near the Anser Island Group. Nature is reclaiming her.


SS Gulf of Carpentaria shipwreck from Alan Beckhurst on Vimeo.

The Gulf of Carpentaria is historically significant as the wreck of an international cargo and passenger vessel, and for its role as a link between Britain and her colonies. It is archaeologically significant as it was wrecked without having been salvaged.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: SS Gulf of Carpentaria.

Latitude: 39° 8.775′ S   (39.14625° S / 39° 8′ 46.5″ S)
Longitude: 146° 17.645′ E   (146.294083° E / 146° 17′ 38.7″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-15 13:24:11 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Cambridge, 17,544 m, bearing 96°, E
Steamship, 2434/ 1569 ton.
Built: West Hartlepool, UK, 1881.
Sunk: 15 September 1885.
Depth: 48 to 50 m.
Dive only on: SWF, SWE.

Elm Grove

Wreck Dive Boat access

There were only two survivors when the barque Elm Grove was driven ashore on the Five Mile Beach at Wilsons Promontory. Seven seamen lost their lives.

Capt Leddra had previously been in command of the Vanquish, wrecked at Cape Jervis SA in 1864 and the A.H. Badger which sank after a collision with the SS Nevada in the Tasman Sea off NSW in October 1871 (Caldow).

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: Elm Grove.

Latitude: 38° 55.017′ S   (38.916944° S / 38° 55′ 1″ S)
Longitude: 146° 28.300′ E   (146.471667° E / 146° 28′ 18″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-15 22:25:55 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Miranda, 825 m, bearing 60°, ENE
Wooden barque.
Built: New Brunswick, Canada, 1863.
Sunk: 9 September 1876.

Lune

Wreck Dive Boat access

The Swedish barque Lune was on a voyage from Newcastle to Batavia via Melbourne loaded with coal. In a thick fog it struck a reef on the eastern side of Cliffy Island. The crew reached safety, but the vessel soon broke up and sank in the heavy swell.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: Lune.

Latitude: 38° 57.000′ S   (38.95° S / 38° 57′ S)
Longitude: 146° 42.000′ E   (146.7° E / 146° 42′ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-14 16:30:08 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Miranda, 19,461 m, bearing 282°, WNW
-38 57.000
146 42.000
(WGS84)
Source: GPS

Miranda

Wreck Dive Boat access

The wooden brigantine Miranda was a regular Bass Strait trader from Hobart and Launceston to Port Albert. It carried general cargo and building material to Port Albert and livestock to Tasmania. The vessel anchored in the shelter of Rabbit Island on a voyage from Hobart to Port Albert in August 1852. A strong south easterly caused the vessel to part from both anchors, and it went ashore in a cove on Wilson's Promontory that now bears its name. No lives were lost, but the vessel was subsequently condemned, and burnt on the beach where it lay.

The Miranda is significant as an example of an Australian built cargo ship working in the Bass Strait trade.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: Miranda.

Latitude: 38° 54.800′ S   (38.913333° S / 38° 54′ 48″ S)
Longitude: 146° 28.800′ E   (146.48° E / 146° 28′ 48″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-16 02:58:15 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Elm Grove, 825 m, bearing 240°, WSW

Victorian Shipwrecks West of Melbourne

Antares

Wreck Dive Boat access
Antares
Antares
© Unknown

The Antares is significant as a sail trader carrying an international inbound cargo. It is part of the Great Ocean Road Historic Shipwreck Trail.

The Italian barque Antares left Marseilles 18th December 1913 for Melbourne, but failed to arrive. In November 1914 wreckage was found at the base of a cliff at the Bay of Islands near Warrnambool and a body had washed ashore. Some of the timbers were charred by fire, and a small boat's stern board with the name Sutlej led to the identification of the wreck as Antares which had been reported missing.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: Antares, and Australian National Shipwreck Database: Antares.

Latitude: 38° 33.500′ S   (38.558333° S / 38° 33′ 30″ S)
Longitude: 142° 45.750′ E   (142.7625° E / 142° 45′ 45″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-14 22:41:35 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Falls of Halladale, 10,015 m, bearing 123°, ESE
Iron barque, 1742 ton.
Built: Glasgow, Scotland, 1888.
Sunk: November 1914.

Balmoral

Wreck Dive Boat access

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: Balmoral, and Australian National Shipwreck Database: Balmoral.

Latitude: 38° 22.583′ S   (38.376388° S / 38° 22′ 35″ S)
Longitude: 142° 14.800′ E   (142.246667° E / 142° 14′ 48″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-14 22:46:38 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Essington, 1,204 m, bearing 192°, SSW
Wooden schooner.
Sunk: 9 July 1868.

Casino

Wreck Dive Shore access
Casino
Casino
© Unknown

The SS Casino is historically significant for its vital role in the Western District coastal and passenger trade. This significance is enhanced by the longevity of the Casino's service to this trade - it was wrecked on the eve of celebrating its 50th anniversary. In September 1998 the wreck of the SS Casino and its associated relics were permanently specially declared to be of historic significance. Of the total of eighteen steamships that served the Western District between 1854 and 1939 there are only four of these vessels represented in the Victorian wreck resource: the SS Champion, TSS Coramba, SS Julia Percy (SS Leeuwin) and the SS Casino. The Casino and Champion are the only two of these wrecks that are located in the Western District, and the Casino is the only one of these that has been located and is accessible to divers.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: SS Casino, and Dive Information Sheet: SS Casino (1882-1932) (Adobe PDF | 165.9 KB).

Latitude: 38° 44.600′ S   (38.743333° S / 38° 44′ 36″ S)
Longitude: 143° 40.750′ E   (143.679167° E / 143° 40′ 45″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-18 20:05:23 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Grange, 3,809 m, bearing 192°, SSW
SS Casino, Iron steamship.
Depth: 9 m.

Children

Wreck Dive Boat access

One of the first vessels to be lost in the Western District was the barque Children, which was wrecked to the East of Warrnambool in February 1839. When the vessel ran ashore in hurricane-force winds, 22 passengers and crew were fortunate to escape being battered to death on the rocks. The Children broke up within 20 minutes, sweeping sixteen of those on board to their deaths. After eleven days, the survivors, all of whom were injured, were rescued and taken to Portland.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: Children.

Latitude: 38° 29.500′ S   (38.491667° S / 38° 29′ 30″ S)
Longitude: 142° 40.400′ E   (142.673333° E / 142° 40′ 24″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-15 22:14:29 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Antares, 10,729 m, bearing 133°, SE
Wooden barque.
Built: Liverpool, England, 1825.
Sunk: 14 January 1838.

Diana - Port Fairy

Wreck Dive Boat access

The Tasmanian-built brig Diana was wrecked at Port Fairy when driven ashore by a gale. Captain Mills, the Harbour Master, and some whalers rowed to the vessel and secured a line, allowing the crew to reach safety.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: Diana.

Latitude: 38° 21.967′ S   (38.366112° S / 38° 21′ 58″ S)
Longitude: 142° 15.733′ E   (142.262222° E / 142° 15′ 44″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-26 18:00:10 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Balmoral, 1,773 m, bearing 229°, SW
Wooden brig.
Built: Hobart, Tasmania, 1840.
Sunk: 1 October 1844.

Edinburgh Castle

Wreck Dive Boat access
Edinburgh Castle
Edinburgh Castle
© Unknown

A mistake by the pilot resulted in the barque Edinburgh Castle going ashore in calm weather in Lady Bay at Warrnambool. The vessel was loaded with cement for the new breakwater, and hopes were high that it could be refloated. However, it soon began to settle into the sand, and then broke up in subsequent rough weather.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: Edinburgh Castle, and Dive Information Sheet: Edinburgh Castle (1863-1888) (Adobe PDF | 327.59 KB).

Latitude: 38° 24.150′ S   (38.4025° S / 38° 24′ 9″ S)
Longitude: 142° 29.580′ E   (142.493° E / 142° 29′ 34.8″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-18 19:36:54 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: La Bella, 1,033 m, bearing 258°, WSW
Three masted iron barque.
Built: Glasgow, Scotland, 1863.
Sunk: 15 January 1888.
Depth: 5 m.

Emily S

Wreck Dive Boat access

The Emily S lies about 350 metres east of Lawrence Rock on the sheltered side. A purpose sunk wreck she lays beautifully upright on her keel in 24 metres between two rocky reefs.

The Emily S was scuttled on the 1st September 1991 by the PDS dive club. The Emily S is an old fishing trawler, 30 metres in length. She is still in great intact condition and is a great dive for beginers to experience some easy penetration dives on. Often has a family of Weedy Seadragons near the prop.

Latitude: 38° 24.500′ S   (38.408333° S / 38° 24′ 30″ S)
Longitude: 141° 40.000′ E   (141.666667° E / 141° 40′ 0″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-16 22:00:35 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: New Zealander, 9,103 m, bearing 326°, NW
Tug.
Max Depth: 24 m.

Essington

Wreck Dive Boat access

The wreck of the brig Essington is archaeologically significant for its remains of an early Australian built vessel. It is historically significant for its role in the whaling industry and in the early development of Victoria, and for its association with the pioneers Captain Mills and John Griffiths.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: Essington.

Latitude: 38° 23.217′ S   (38.386945° S / 38° 23′ 13″ S)
Longitude: 142° 14.617′ E   (142.243612° E / 142° 14′ 37″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-15 22:27:13 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Balmoral, 1,204 m, bearing 12°, NNE
Wooden brig.
Built: Government Dockyard, Sydney, 1826.
Sunk: 3 May 1852.

Falls of Halladale

Wreck Dive Boat access
Falls of Halladale
Falls of Halladale
© Unknown

The four masted barque Falls of Halladale was 102 days out from New York when it ran ashore at Peterborough at 3 am on the morning of 14th November 1908. Within minutes, water poured into the holds and the crew safely disembarked and rowed for three hours until they beached at the Bay of Islands. The vessel grounded in fair weather on an ENE tack. A mist over the land created an optical illusion of a distant horizon, and the crew thought the ship was 10 miles off the coast when it was less than one mile away, heading for the rocks. When the danger was discovered, it was too late. The anchors could not be let go in time, and the ship had no headway to change tack. The Falls of Halladale struck heavily amidships, about 200 yards from shore. Soon after abandoning the ship, the crew found the stern awash with breakers sweeping over the decks as far as t he foremast.

The vessel lay in a small bay just to the west of Peterborough with its sails set, and provided a spectacle for sightseers. Two salvage ventures proved to be financial disasters. The captain of the Falls of Halladale was found guilty of a gross act of misconduct in that he carelessly navigated the vessel. His certificate was suspended for six months.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: Falls of Halladale, and Dive Information Sheet: Falls of Halladale (1886-1908) (Adobe PDF | 506.84 KB).

Latitude: 38° 36.500′ S   (38.608333° S / 38° 36′ 30″ S)
Longitude: 142° 51.500′ E   (142.858333° E / 142° 51′ 30″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-18 19:55:14 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Schomberg, 2,603 m, bearing 110°, ESE
Four masted iron barque.
Built: Greenock, Scotland, 1886.
Sunk: 14 November 1908.
Depth 14 m.

Fiji

Wreck Dive Boat access

The Fiji is archaeologically significant as the wreck of a typical 19th century international sailing ship with cargo. It is educationally and recreationally significant as one of Victoria's most spectacular historic shipwreck dive sites with structural features and remains of the cargo evident.

The barque Fiji left Hamburg on 22nd of May 1891. The vessel went ashore at 3 am on the morning of the disaster in squally and boisterous weather soon after sighting Cape Otway. The wind had suddenly veered, and the vessel missed stays after attempting to wear ship and was driven onto the rocks. Attempts were made to launch the boats but they were swamped and dashed to pieces. Delays in getting the lifeboat and rocket apparatus to the scene resulted in 12 of the 25 crew drowning after 10 hours trapped on board. A local resident, Arthur Wilkinson, lost his life trying to save one of the crew who was struggling in the surf. Coffins were made out of the wreck timbers and the men buried on the cliff top above the wreck. The deaths precipitated critical comment in the press over the lack of prompt action. Other news items appeared claiming drunk and disorderly behaviour by plunderers amongst the corpses and wreckage on the beach. The controversy reached parliament.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: Fiji, and Dive Information Sheet: Fiji (1875-1891) (Adobe PDF | 667.25 KB).

Latitude: 38° 45.750′ S   (38.7625° S / 38° 45′ 45″ S)
Longitude: 143° 13.500′ E   (143.225° E / 143° 13′ 30″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-18 20:03:07 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Loch Ard, 18,186 m, bearing 312°, NW
Three masted iron barque.
Built: Belfast, Ireland, 1875.
Sunk: 6 September 1891.
Depth: 7 m.

Grange

Wreck Dive Boat access

The Grange, which lies near Little Haley Reef, Apollo Bay, is archaeologically significant as an example of a Scottish built wooden barque and international trader, with remains of its wooden hull available for study. It is a typical vessel as used in international and coastal cargo and passenger carrying trades in the early to mid 19th century ie: representative of a particular category or type. It is educationally and recreationally significant as it is one of the only wooden vessels accessible to recreational divers along this stretch of the coast.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: Grange.

Latitude: 38° 46.610′ S   (38.776837° S / 38° 46′ 36.61″ S)
Longitude: 143° 40.201′ E   (143.670015° E / 143° 40′ 12.05″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-15 23:18:21 GMT
Source: Google Earth
Nearest Neighbour: Casino, 3,809 m, bearing 12°, NNE
Wooden barque, 300 ton.
Built: Scotland, 1840.
Sunk: 24 March 1858.
Depth: 5 m.

La Bella

Wreck Dive Boat access

La Bella lies in Lady Bay, Warrnambool. The La Bella is typical of the type of medium sized iron / steel sailing vessels sailing in an age where sail was being rapidly superseded by steam ie: representative of a type.

Wrecked on 10/11/1905 after hitting rocks south of the Warrnambool breakwater (now known as La Bella Reef) in heavy seas.

The brave rescue of five crew by local fisherman William Ferrier made him a national hero and upon its declaration as an Historic Shipwreck in 1992 the La Bella was declared a 'monument to bravery'.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: La Bella, and Dive Information Sheet: La Bella (1883-1905) (Adobe PDF | 1.34 MB).

Latitude: 38° 24.258′ S   (38.4043° S / 38° 24′ 15.48″ S)
Longitude: 142° 28.882′ E   (142.481367° E / 142° 28′ 52.92″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-18 19:53:01 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Edinburgh Castle, 1,033 m, bearing 78°, ENE
Four masted barquentine sailing ship.
Depth: 13 m.

Loch Ard

Wreck Dive Boat access
Loch Ard
Loch Ard
© Unknown

The Loch Ard is historically significant as one of Victoria and Australia's worst shipwreck tragedies. It is archaeologically significant for its remains of a large international passenger and cargo ship. It is highly educationally and recreationally significant as one of Victoria's most spectacular diving sites, and popular tourist sites in Port Campbell National Park.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: Loch Ard, and Dive Information Sheet: Loch Ard (1873-1878) (Adobe PDF | 705.9 KB).

Latitude: 38° 39.060′ S   (38.651° S / 38° 39′ 3.6″ S)
Longitude: 143° 4.300′ E   (143.071667° E / 143° 4′ 18″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-18 20:00:52 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Newfield, 14,124 m, bearing 281°, W
Square rigged iron sailing ship.
Depth: 25 m.

New Zealander

Wreck Dive Boat access

The New Zealander departed from Liverpool on the 23rd August to Australia carrying 465 assisted passengers. The immigrants were mainly Irish (103) and Scottish (362). After unloading the passengers, and 16 days in Portland, the vessel underwent an extensive refit. 18 of the original crew had to be jailed for failing to prepare for the return journey. On the 16th December, after Captain Brown had tried to muster a new crew, the ship was found ablaze at 4am. It was towed to the beach at Whalers Bluff and continued to burn. One theory at the time was that the cook set the ship alight because the crew had wanted to go ashore, whilst another theory was spontaneous combustion of the coal cargo, fuelled by the new varnish which kept the hull burning. The vessel burned for 2 to 3 weeks, and was visible for many years above the water at the foot of the lighthouse. Spruce, pine, birch, iron hanging knees, yellow metal.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: New Zealander.

Latitude: 38° 20.400′ S   (38.34° S / 38° 20′ 24″ S)
Longitude: 141° 36.550′ E   (141.609167° E / 141° 36′ 33″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-16 03:02:53 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Emily S, 9,103 m, bearing 146°, SE

Newfield

Wreck Dive Boat access
Newfield
Newfield
© Unknown

Mistook Cape Otway Light for one on King Island The Newfield had left on 28th May from Sharpness. Exceptionally rough weather had been encountered and hurricanes and storms after the Cape of Good Hope. The Cape Otway light was sighted in squally, bumpy weather, but the captain was under the impression it was the King Island light. The ships chronometers were wrong. Orders were given to tack the ship away from the light, which headed it straight for the cliffs of the Victorian coast. The vessel struck rocks about 100 yards from shore, and 5' of water filled the holds immediately. The captain gave orders to lower the boats which caused a disorganised scramble for safety among the crew. The panic resulted in the deaths of 9 men including the captain when they drowned after the boats capsized in heavy seas. The 17 men who regained the ship decided to wait until daylight, and rowed to Peterborough in the ships jollyboat and gig when locals failed to secure a rocket apparatus line to the ship. The Marine Board inquiry found the wreck was caused by a "one man style of navigation" and that the Captain had not heeded the advice of his crew.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: Newfield.

Latitude: 38° 37.500′ S   (38.625° S / 38° 37′ 30″ S)
Longitude: 142° 54.750′ E   (142.9125° E / 142° 54′ 45″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-16 03:03:23 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Schomberg, 2,455 m, bearing 292°, WNW

Orungal

Wreck Dive Shore access
Open Water Rated Outside Port Phillip Bay Wreck Dive Site
Orungal
Orungal
© Unknown

The SS Orungal, near Formby Reef, Barwon Heads, has social and historical significance for its role as an interstate passenger and mail steamer in the inter-war period, and as a chartered vessel represents the economic impact of the Depression on Australian shipping lines, especially the AUSNCo. It also represents the risks and threats faced by domestic shipping in World War II.

The wreck of the Orungal is about 700m offshore from the mouth of the Barwon River. It's a nice dive in about 10m, though the shipwreck is pretty broken up. The boilers stick up out of the water at low tide.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: SS Orungal, and Australian National Shipwreck Database: S.S. Orungal.

Latitude: 38° 17.267′ S   (38.287783° S / 38° 17′ 16.02″ S)
Longitude: 144° 30.606′ E   (144.5101° E / 144° 30′ 36.36″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-27 05:55:45 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Chimney Rock, 1,635 m, bearing 201°, SSW
Steel Steamer.
Built: 1923.
Lost: 20 Nov 1940.

Osprey

Wreck Dive Boat access

The remains of the Osprey are archaeologically and historically significant as evidence of the timber trade and early development of Lorne. It is the only positively located wreck site in Louttit Bay. It is historically significant as the earliest known site of any kind associated with Lorne's settlement, and for its role in the early development of the Lorne and the Otway region generally.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: Osprey.

Latitude: 38° 32.100′ S   (38.535° S / 38° 32′ 6″ S)
Longitude: 143° 58.700′ E   (143.978333° E / 143° 58′ 42″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-16 03:05:26 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Casino, 34,811 m, bearing 228°, SW

Rubicon

Wreck Dive Boat access

The schooner Rubicon was loading lime for Melbourne at the jetty at Walkerville when a heavy swell set in. The vessel was hauled off from the jetty to the safety of the anchorage. Shortly afterwards, the wind shifted and the ship parted from its cables and drove onto the rocks to become a total wreck in W aratah Bay, Wilson Promontory. The Victorian Steam Navigation Board investigated the circumstances attending the wrecking of the vessel and found that the wreck was caused by stress of weather and no claim could be attached to master or crew.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: Rubicon.

Latitude: 38° 51.500′ S   (38.858333° S / 38° 51′ 30″ S)
Longitude: 141° 36.390′ E   (141.6065° E / 141° 36′ 23.4″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-16 06:05:08 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Emily S, 50,310 m, bearing 5°, N

Schomberg

Wreck Dive Boat access

Schomberg was a large clipper ship built for James Baines' famous Black Ball Line. Schomberg has historical significance as one of the luxurious ships built to bring emigrants to Australia, cashing in on the gold rush era. The clipper is one of only three clipper wrecks in Victorian waters that operated the England to Australia run. While the other two, Empress of the Sea and Lightening, were built by the famous American shipbuilder, Donald MacKay, Schomberg was built in Aberdeen. It was an attempt to build a faster ship than MacKay and a vessel fast enough to break the sailing record to Australia. Schomberg never got the chance to break any records, sinking on its maiden voyage to Australia (Heritage Victoria 2010).

Schomberg has interpretative significance as part of the Underwater Shipwreck Discvoery Trail (Lomdahl 1992) and the land-based West Coast Historic Shipwreck Trail (Heritage Victoria 1994). The vessel, which lies at Curdies Inlet, Peterborough, is badly broken up and the remains are heavily concreted. Schomberg is not currently the subject of any archaeological or scientific studies.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: Schomberg, and Dive Information Sheet: Schomberg (1855-1855) (Adobe PDF | 604.27 KB).

Latitude: 38° 37.000′ S   (38.616667° S / 38° 37′ 0″ S)
Longitude: 142° 53.180′ E   (142.886333° E / 142° 53′ 10.8″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-18 19:57:43 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Newfield, 2,455 m, bearing 112°, ESE
Three masted wooden clipper.
Depth: 9 m.

South Milton

Wreck Dive Boat access

The South Milton has historical and archaeological significance as the wreck of an inward bound international merchant ship, although the site near Charlemont Reef, Barwon Heads, does not retain a high level of integrity being easily accessible by boat and having been extensively visited over the years. It represents the remains of a typical 19th century British built wooden sailing vessel i.e.: representative of a type.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: South Milton.

Latitude: 38° 18.130′ S   (38.302167° S / 38° 18′ 7.8″ S)
Longitude: 144° 29.060′ E   (144.484333° E / 144° 29′ 3.6″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-16 06:08:47 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Chimney Rock, 1,657 m, bearing 87°, E
Sailing ship.
Sunk: 1870s.

Victoria Tower

Wreck Dive Boat access
Victoria Tower
Victoria Tower
© Unknown

The Victoria Tower is archaeologically significant as the wreck of an international inward-bound passenger and cargo vessel. It is educationally and recreationally significant as a coherently intact example of a British built iron clipper i.e.: representative of a class or type. Along with the wrecks of the Light of the Age (1868 - American-built wooden clipper ship) and Sussex (1871 - Blackwall frigate) nearby these vessels represent the three major design classes, and span the evolution of commercial and immigrant sailing ships used by the British in the colonial Australian trade in the last half of the nineteenth century.

The Victoria Tower was on a voyage from Liverpool, England to Melbourne when she ran ashore in thick weather on 17 October 1869 at Point Impossible, west of Thompsons Creek, Breamlea.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: Victoria Tower, and Dive Information Sheet: Victoria Tower (1869-1869) (Adobe PDF | 542.03 KB).

Latitude: 38° 18.971′ S   (38.316183° S / 38° 18′ 58.26″ S)
Longitude: 144° 22.002′ E   (144.3667° E / 144° 22′ 0.12″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-18 20:09:31 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Torquay Offshore Artificial Reef, 2,295 m, bearing 168°, SSE
Three masted iron hulled clipper, 1563 ton.
Sunk: 1869.
Depth: 8 m.

Victorian Shipwrecks East of Melbourne

Albert

Wreck Dive Boat access
Outside Port Phillip Bay Technical Rated Wreck Dive Site

Wooden Ketch | Max Depth: 70 metres (230 feet) — Graveyard

Albert
Albert
© Unknown

The Albert was a ketch that sprang a leak in rough seas shortly after leaving Lorne, Victoria for Melbourne. The pilot schooner Rip took her in tow but she founded about three nautical miles outside Port Phillip heads.

Built in 1884 and sunk on 13 August 1890, the overall length of the vessel was approximately 22.43 metres (74 feet), beam 6.13 metres (20 feet) with a displacement weight of 42 tonne (46 short tons).

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: Albert, and Australian National Shipwreck Database: Albert.

Latitude: 38° 44.862′ S   (38.7477° S / 38° 44′ 51.72″ S)
Longitude: 146° 39.576′ E   (146.6596° E / 146° 39′ 34.56″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-23 19:54:50 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Clonmel, 1,631 m, bearing 75°, ENE
Ketch, 42 ton.
Built: Footscray, Victoria, 1884.
Sunk: 13 August 1890.
Depth: 69 to 70 m.

Amazon

Wreck Boat access

The Amazon lies in Venus Bay near Andersons Inlet on Victoria's East Coast.

Amazon left Melbourne bound for Mauritius on 12 December 1869 with a cargo of salted meats. The vessel cleared Port Phillip Heads at 8 pm that same evening and turned to starboard to head west towards the Indian Ocean. By 2 am on the 13 December the wind had picked up and by 4 am the Captain reported the gale had turned into a hurricane. 14 miles off Cape Otway, the wind tore off some of Amazon's sails. By the 14 December, Amazon attempted to return to the Heads and the relative safety of Port Phillip but by noon on the 15th, the Captain realised they weren't going to make it and turned his attention to keeping his vessel away from the shore.

Amazon continued to drift east as the storm still raged through into the next day and at 6 am, there were breakers off the port bow and rocks ahead. Amazon struck the beach near what is now the Inverloch surf beach at 10 am and Captain Ogier kept the vessel on course in an effort to drive the ship as far up the beach as possible. The crew, having been on deck for 48 hours straight, were exhausted, and it wasn't until 3 pm in the afternoon that everyone made it to shore.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: Amazon, and Australian National Shipwreck Database: Amazon.

Latitude: 38° 38.912′ S   (38.648533° S / 38° 38′ 54.72″ S)
Longitude: 145° 41.773′ E   (145.696217° E / 145° 41′ 46.38″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-14 22:39:59 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Artisan, 10,076 m, bearing 263°, W
Wooden ship, 363 ton.
Built: Jersey, 1839.
Sunk: 13 December 1863.

Artisan

Wreck Shore access

The Artisan lies in Harmers Haven, Cape Paterson. The vessel is historically significant to the community of Wonthaggi, however archaeologically the vessel has limited significance due to it being totally wrecked, however some information might be obtained from the small sections of the wreck washed up into the creek bed.

See also, MAAV: Artisan 1881-1901, Australian National Shipwreck Database: Artisan, and Heritage Council Victoria: Artisan

Latitude: 38° 39.568′ S   (38.659467° S / 38° 39′ 34.08″ S)
Longitude: 145° 34.862′ E   (145.581033° E / 145° 34′ 51.72″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-14 22:42:31 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Amazon, 10,076 m, bearing 83°, E
Large wooden barque, 1155 ton.
Built: St John, New Brunswick, Canada, 1881.
Sunk: 23 April 1901.

Blackbird

Wreck Dive Boat access

The SS Blackbird lies off the southern shore of Clonmel Island, Port Albert, in shallow water. The SS Blackbird is archaeologically and recreationally significant as a representative example of auxillary steamer involved in the Australian colonial coastal trade.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: Blackbird, Australian National Shipwreck Database: Blackbird, MMAV: S.S.Blackbird 1863-1878, and Dive Information Sheet: SS Blackbird (1863-1878) (Adobe PDF | 584.24 KB).

Latitude: 38° 43.268′ S   (38.721133° S / 38° 43′ 16.08″ S)
Longitude: 146° 41.902′ E   (146.698367° E / 146° 41′ 54.12″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-18 19:50:32 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Clonmel, 3,106 m, bearing 215°, SW
SS Blackbird, Steamship.
Built: Newcastle on Tyne, 1863.
Sunk: 1878.

Clonmel

Wreck Dive Boat access

Historic shipwreck protected zone. Permit Required.

The paddle steamer Clonmel was one of the first steam-powered vessels on the Australian coast. However, its career was short, being wrecked on its third voyage on what is now known as Clonmel Island at the Port Albert entrance. All on board reached safety, but much of the cargo was lost.The wreck of the PS Clonmel was instrumental in the settlement of Gippsland and the establishment of the towns of Port Albert, Tarraville and Alberton. Although the wreck of the Clonmel was a disaster at the time, it is now one of the most significant archaeological sites in Victoria. The site is archaeologically significant for being the earliest located steamship wreck in Australian waters. It is also technically significant for the remains of a wooden hulled paddle steamship, including its early flue type boiler which is believed to be the only example known in Australia. It is historically significant for its role in the discovery of Port Albert and subsequent development of Gippsland.

A 50 metre radius Protected Zone (prohibited entry without a permit from Heritage Victoria) has been declared around the position of the boiler situated at latitude 38 deg 44' 44" S, longitude 146 deg 40' 37" E.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: PS Clonmel.

Latitude: 38° 44.640′ S   (38.744° S / 38° 44′ 38.4″ S)
Longitude: 146° 40.668′ E   (146.6778° E / 146° 40′ 40.08″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-14 20:26:51 GMT
Source: Victorian Government GPS (verified)
Nearest Neighbour: Wave, 1,612 m, bearing 173°, S
Historic shipwreck protected zone.
Permit Required.

Duke of Wellington

Wreck Dive Boat access

The barque Duke of Wellington was on a voyage from Melbourne to Newcastle for coal when it was becalmed. Although the anchors were dropped, the vessel drifted ashore at Tarwin Lower. The Duke of Wellington was left high on the beach, and significant wreckage still remains.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: Duke of Wellington.

Latitude: 38° 49.050′ S   (38.8175° S / 38° 49′ 3″ S)
Longitude: 146° 57.000′ E   (146.95° E / 146° 57′ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-16 21:38:41 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Blackbird, 24,305 m, bearing 296°, WNW
Wooden barque.
Built: Carleton, New Brunswick, Canada, 1840.
Sunk: 3 April 1853.

Glenelg

Wreck Dive Boat access

Historic shipwreck protected zone. Permit Required.

Glenelg
Glenelg
© Unknown

SS Glenelg, which lies in Bass Strait, near Lakes Entrance, is historically significant as one of the worst maritime disasters in Victorian history, with the deaths of at least 38 people and only three survivors. The wreck has the potential for archaeological significance with some of the hull preserved under the sand. These remains may provide unknown technical detail of iron shipbuilding, details of the refit the vessel underwent in 1898 and information pertaining to life on board a typical cargo/passenger vessel at the turn of the century. SS Glenelg is representative of the fleet of small iron steamers on the small country trading routes around Australia.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: SS Glenelg.

Latitude: 38° 33.144′ S   (38.5524° S / 38° 33′ 8.64″ S)
Longitude: 147° 12.444′ E   (147.2074° E / 147° 12′ 26.64″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-14 20:27:26 GMT
Source: Victorian Government GPS (verified)
Nearest Neighbour: Duke of Wellington, 36,988 m, bearing 217°, SW
Historic shipwreck protected zone.
Permit Required.

Magnat

Wreck Dive Boat access

Very flat bottomed, German owned and registered vessel 4 Single deck, 2 tiers of beams, 1 cemented bulkhead, anchors and chains proofed and tested. Captain Ostermann believed strong currents carried him more than twenty miles off course. Local stockmen found the wreck the next morning with the crew armed with knives ready to defend themselves against Aborigines.

The vessel was embedded in six feet of sand twenty feet from low water mark. In early July Mssrs. W and J. Lempriere acting for the Board of Bremmen Underwriters arranged to try and float the vessel free. Tugs pulled the vessel free but before it was clear the lines snapped and the Magnat went ashore again, this time breaking its back. The captain and crew stayed on the vessel, but Captain Ostermann later died on the Magnat and was buried locally. A dance was held for the locals on the stricken vessel. The Magnat was due to load coal in Newcastle bound for Chile. Captain Ostermann had lost his previous vessel, also named Magnat, off the coast of Chile where he was jailed for two years over the incident, but released earlier when it was proven the charts were incorrect.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: Magnat, and MMAV: Magnat 1885-1900.

Latitude: 38° 41.950′ S   (38.699167° S / 38° 41′ 57″ S)
Longitude: 145° 47.783′ E   (145.796389° E / 145° 47′ 47″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-16 02:55:29 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Amazon, 10,360 m, bearing 302°, WNW
1120-ton, three masted iron barque.
Built: Sunderland, England, 1885.
Sunk: 8 May 1900.

Monumental City

Wreck Dive Boat access

The American steamer Monumental City was one of the first screw steamers to cross the Pacific, attracted by the Victorian gold rush. It had previously been involved in the Californian gold rush carrying passengers from Nicaragua to San Francisco as they crossed the American continent from Europe and the east coast of America. The surviving engine parts and propellor are significant as they represent a transition phase from wooden hulled steamships to iron screw steamships, and a phase of rapid development in marine steam engine technology. It is also rare as at the time most American steamships were paddle steamers. It had a short career on the Australian coast, being wrecked on Tullaberga Island after only one month in service. Thirty seven lives were lost in the disaster, of whom 35 were passengers including its owner, and it led to the building of the Gabo Island lighthouse.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: Monumental City.

Latitude: 37° 33.500′ S   (37.558333° S / 37° 33′ 30″ S)
Longitude: 149° 50.700′ E   (149.845° E / 149° 50′ 42″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-16 02:59:09 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Schah, 16,458 m, bearing 230°, SW

Schah

Wreck Dive Boat access
Schah
Schah
© Unknown

The Schah is the second oldest identified wreck in Victorian coastal waters. It is of great historical value as a onetime illegal African slave trader, and for its short involvement with early prominent Australian colonists, John and John Robert Raine. The archaeological potential is also very high as the remains of the wreckage still exist at Shipwreck Creek, 6 miles SE of Mallacoota.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: Schah.

Latitude: 37° 39.100′ S   (37.651667° S / 37° 39′ 6″ S)
Longitude: 149° 42.000′ E   (149.7° E / 149° 42′ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-16 06:06:25 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Monumental City, 16,458 m, bearing 50°, NE

Tomatin

Wreck Dive Boat access

A severe gale on the Gippsland coast in July 1865 claimed three colliers sheltering at Wilsons Promontory, the Natal, Lady Young and Tomatin. After one of the Tomatin's anchor chains parted, the crew attempted to sail into the lee of Rabbit Island. However, the force of the gale was so great that the vessel was driven onto rocks on the mainland in Johnny Souey Cove, Wilsons Promontory, where it broke up rapidly. The crew abandoned ship before the Tomatin struck, and they were able to reach safety in Sealers Cove.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: Tomatin, and Australian National Shipwreck Database: Tomatin.

Latitude: 38° 48.000′ S   (38.8° S / 38° 48′ S)
Longitude: 146° 29.400′ E   (146.49° E / 146° 29′ 24″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-16 09:20:12 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Victorian, 11,019 m, bearing 33°, NNE

Victorian

Wreck Dive Boat access

Screw Steamer | Graveyard

The Victorian was dismantled and then scuttled in the Ships Graveyard, Commonwealth Area No.3, Bass Strait, on 8 May 1925.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: Victorian.

Latitude: 38° 43.014′ S   (38.7169° S / 38° 43′ 0.84″ S)
Longitude: 146° 33.554′ E   (146.559233° E / 146° 33′ 33.24″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-16 09:22:45 GMT
Source: Unknown
Nearest Neighbour: Albert, 9,355 m, bearing 111°, ESE
SS Victorian, Steal hulled steam ship, 718 ton.
Built: Glasgow, Scotland, 1876.
Scuttled: 8 May 1925.

Wave

Wreck Dive Boat access

The schooner Wave was chartered to carry stone to be used in improving the roads around Port Albert and Tarraville. The vessel approached the Port Albert bar with a load from Corner Inlet, but was forced to anchor due to a strong north west wind. After riding safely at anchor for three hours, the cable parted and the Wave was blown onto a sandbank, becoming a total wreck on 11 December 1859.

See also, Heritage Council Victoria: Wave.

Latitude: 38° 45.504′ S   (38.7584° S / 38° 45′ 30.24″ S)
Longitude: 146° 40.797′ E   (146.67995° E / 146° 40′ 47.82″ E)
Datum: WGS84 Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2018-01-16 09:23:57 GMT
Source: GPS
Nearest Neighbour: Clonmel, 1,612 m, bearing 353°, N


DISCLAIMER: No claim is made by The Scuba Doctor as to the accuracy of the dive site coordinates listed here. Should anyone decide to use these GPS marks to locate and dive on a site, they do so entirely at their own risk. Always verify against other sources.

The marks come from numerous sources including commercial operators, independent dive clubs, reference works, and active divers. Some are known to be accurate, while others may not be. Some GPS marks may even have come from maps using the AGD66 datum, and thus may need be converted to the WGS84 datum. To distinguish between the possible accuracy of the dive site marks, we've tried to give each mark a source of GPS, Google Earth, or unknown.

If you don't understand the differences between the different ways coordinates are given, plus how different datum come into play, you might find the article GPS Conversions by Lloyd Borrett (100 Kb, 5 pages, Adobe PDF) a useful read. It describes the problems associated with locating dive sites using a GPS receiver.

GPS latitude explained


Scuba Doctor Dive Map KML File

In the true spirit of making it easy to obtain, utilise and share the information, you can now Download/view the Scuba Doctor Dive Map GPS Marks (KML file | 220.98 KB | 05-May-2018) in the Keyhole Markup Language (KML) file format used to display geographic data in an Earth browser such as Google Earth and Google Maps.

Some marine GPS units can import the information from a KML file. For others you can use use a file translate program (e.g. GPSBabel) to convert the KML file into an import file format (e.g. GPX) supported by your GPS unit.


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If you have have information about other dive sites you'd be happy to see added to the information available here, or any corrections and/or updates to the diving site GPS marks listed here, please feel free to Contact Us.

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