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Wareatea

Wreck DiveWreck Dive | Boat access

Outside Port Phillip Bay Technical Rated Wreck Dive Site

Passenger and Cargo Steamer | Max Depth: 48 metres (157 feet) — Graveyard

Wareatea
Wareatea
© State Library Victoria

The Wareatea was built in 1883 in Paisly, Scotland. It was first used as a collier in New Zealand, and later in the Bass Strait trade carrying passengers and freight. She ran between Melbourne and the North coast of Tasmania between Federation in 1901 and the end of WWII in 1945. After decommissioning, the stripped down hulk was scuttled on 16 March 1945.


Wreck of the Wareatea, by Jane Headley.

Wareatea
Wareatea
© Unknown

The overall length of the vessel was approximately 51.88 metres (170 feet), beam 7.96 metres (26 feet) and draught 3.47 metres (11 feet) giving a displacement weight of 511 tonne (563 short tons).

The Wareatea shipwreck has great life on it with nice sponge growth and schools of fish around. While the bow is somewhat twisted and flat to the seabed, the stern stands up and has the prop and rudder still in position.

See also, Australian National Shipwreck Database: Wareatea, and
Heritage Council Victoria: Wareatea.

Findling the Wareatea

We're not sure as to the accuracy of the GPS coordinates listed here. The GPS marks we know of in circulation for the Wareatea shipwreck are:

  • Attributed to the book Victoria's Ship's Graveyard:
    Latitude: 38° 21.416′ S   (38.35694° S / 38° 21′ 24.98″ S)
    Longitude: 144° 26.083′ E   (144.43472° E / 144° 26′ 4.99″ E)
  • Actually published in Victoria's Ships' Graveyard:
    Latitude: 38° 21.378′ S   (38.3563° S / 38° 21′ 22.68″ S)
    Longitude: 144° 25.310′ E   (144.42183333° E / 144° 25′ 18.6″ E)
  • VSAG Database:
    Latitude: 38° 23.420′ S   (38.39033333° S / 38° 23′ 25.2″ S)
    Longitude: 144° 26.080′ E   (144.43466667° E / 144° 26′ 4.8″ E)
  • Another Source:
    Latitude: 38° 21.700′ S   (38.36166667° S / 38° 21′ 42″ S)
    Longitude: 144° 26.133′ E   (144.43555° E / 144° 26′ 7.98″ E)

We'd love someone to verify which of these GPS marks is correct, or if none of them are, provide us with an accurate one.

Latitude: 38° 21.416′ S   (38.35694° S / 38° 21′ 24.98″ S)
Longitude: 144° 26.083′ E   (144.43472° E / 144° 26′ 4.99″ E)

Datum: WGS84 | Google Map
Added: 2012-07-22 01:00:00 GMT, Last updated: 2019-05-12 07:18:53 GMT
Source: Book - Victoria's Ships' Graveyard GPS (verified)
Nearest Neighbour: Edward Northcote, 422 m, bearing 281°, W
Steel hulled steamship, 511 ton.
Built: Paisley, Scotland, 1883.
Scuttled: 16 March 1945.
Depth: 48 m.



DISCLAIMER: No claim is made by The Scuba Doctor as to the accuracy of the dive site coordinates listed here. Should anyone decide to use these GPS marks to locate and dive on a site, they do so entirely at their own risk. Always verify against other sources.

The marks come from numerous sources including commercial operators, independent dive clubs, reference works, and active divers. Some are known to be accurate, while others may not be. Some GPS marks may even have come from maps using the AGD66 datum, and thus may need be converted to the WGS84 datum. To distinguish between the possible accuracy of the dive site marks, we've tried to give each mark a source of GPS, Google Earth, or unknown.

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